Inequality Similar to power inequality can take many forms Power is given to

Inequality similar to power inequality can take many

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Inequality Similar to power, inequality can take many forms. Power is given to those of privilege while inequality is the result for those who lack privilege (Johnson, 2006). The principal researcher’s perceived social class power might have produced a censored version of the subjective reality of participants. This censored version might not allow the researchers to record the actual experiences of the students and might influence the coding of the interviews and observations because it influences how the researchers view and report about classism at RIHS. A disproportionate number of social class representations in this project might lead to an over- or under-representation of classist type issues. An over- or under-
15 representation of classism will subsequently influence how materials are analyzed and reported in this study. How material is observed, analyzed, and reported relates directly with the principal researcher’s personal biases about the issues of social class and classism. Biases As a former elementary school counselor, the principal researcher witnessed several displays of classism in his former school. Such displays of classism came primarily from teachers directed towards low social class students. Entering this project, the principal researcher was biased in how he thought about classists’ messages are being communicated by teachers. Furthermore, he was aware of a bias that classism could only be directed at students of low social class. In an attempt to address such biases, the researchers made sure to write an interview guide to incorporate other members of the school environment (i.e., administration, staff, and peers). By asking questions that address all members of the school environment, the principal researcher would reduce the potential to be leading and biased during questioning of students about their experiences with teachers. To address bias that classism is only directed at low social class students, the principal researcher made an attempt to interview different social classes instead of just low social class. Although, the researchers could not control for all issues of power, inequality, and biases, they made an effort to address the issues as they become aware of them. The researchers are aware that power, inequality, and biases were present during the
16 data collection. They will address those issues in the following sections when necessary. Results Emerging ThemesWhen reviewing the data from the interviews and participant observations, multiple themes emerged. Although the data offered multiple themes, for the purposes of this study the researchers will focus only on the four most common themes (a) identity, (b) status symbols, (c) seeking acceptance, and (d) isolation. The researchers decided to focus only on these emerging themes because they seemed to arise most often throughout the interviews and observations. These four emerging themes tend to capture how the participants think about and feel towards social class and classism at RIHS.

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