One of the rooms in the legislative palace was named

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one of the rooms in the Legislative Palace was named after her.[11] In 2002, acommemoration was held in the Departmental Board of Montevideo which includedeulogies by a number of board members, including Bertha Sanseverino.[23] ForInternational Women's Day 2010, she was honored in the Uruguayan postage stampseries Mujeres notables uruguayas (Notable Uruguayan Women).[24] In 2012, astreet in Artigas was named in her honor.[8] A plaza in the Bella Italianeighborhood of Montevideo was named after her in 2015.[25] In August 2019, Law19781, which governs agrarian reforms, was modified to recognize that women hadthe right to acquire land and jointly hold title to it by renaming 16 coloniesthroughout the country after prominent women who had impacted development. Thecolony in the Artigas Department was named in honor of Roballo.[26] In 2020, acultural center in the Nuevo París district of Montevideo was inaugurated in hername.[27]WorksRoballo, Alba (1942). Se levanta el sol [The Sun Rises] (in Spanish).Montevideo. OCLC 41147474.Roballo, Alba (1952). La tarde prodigiosa [The Prodigious Evening] (in Spanish).Montevideo: Prometeo. OCLC 1180290324.Roballo, Alba (1959). Canto a la tierra perdida [Song to the Lost Land] (inSpanish). Montevideo: Imprenta Libertad. OCLC 835486725.Roballo, Alba (1962). Mayo de cenizas [May of Ashes] (in Spanish). Montevideo.[1][11]Roballo, Alba (1963). Réquiem para Miguel [Requiem for Miguel] (in Spanish).Montevideo.[1][11]Roballo, Alba (1967). Poemas sin fecha [Undated Poems] (in Spanish). Montevideo:Alborada. OCLC 253551344.Roballo, Alba (1968). El libro de los adioses [The Book of Goodbyes] (inSpanish). Montevideo: Ediciones Avanzar. OCLC 1899896.Roballo, Alba (1969). Nunca adiós y relatos [Never Goodbye and Stories] (inSpanish). Montevideo.[1]Roballo, Alba (1970). Relato y testimonio [Stories and Testimony] (in Spanish).Montevideo.[1]Roballo, Alba (1970). Tiempo de lobos [Time of Wolves] (in Spanish). Montevideo:Sandino. OCLC 2419241.Roballo, Alba (1971). Poemas del miedo [Poems of Fear] (in Spanish). Montevideo:Bouzout. OCLC 978062393.Roballo, Alba (1981). Heredaras la tierra [Inherit the Earth] (in Spanish).Montevideo: Garcia. OCLC 252851724.Roballo, Alba (1984). La fábrica de la locura [The Factory of Madness] (inSpanish). Córdoba, Argentina: El Cid Editor. OCLC 18442083.Roballo, Alba (1988). Antología [Anthology] (in Spanish). Buenos Aires:Ediciones Libros de Tierra Firme. OCLC 253023048.Roballo, Alba (1992). La casa de humo [The House of Smoke] (in Spanish). BuenosAires: Ediciones Libros de Tierra Firme. OCLC 912760877.NotesPalermo gives her date of birth as 4 June 1909,[1] but this appears incorrect
as her birth was indexed in Uruguay in 1908.[2]Both historian George Reid Andrews and writer Eduardo R. Palermo stated thatRoballo retained her Senate seat in 1971, serving until the coup d'état in 1973.[1][12] The hommage presented by Óscar Groba [es] to the Uruguayan legislaturein 2018 states "En las elecciones de noviembre de 1971, la Lista 9988 sacó31.000 votos, de los cuales 18.000 eran de Montevideo; no era la votaciónesperada. Michelini conservó su escaño, pero Roballo no salió reelecta..." [Inthe elections of November 1971, the List 9988 (Broad Front) obtained 31,000votes, of which 18,000 were from Montevideo; it was not the expected vote.

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Term
Spring
Professor
Bishop
Tags
Uruguay, Exlegisladora Alba Roballo

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