Others were taught how to become gladiators since they would bring significant

Others were taught how to become gladiators since

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the farms. Others were taught how to become gladiators since they would bring significant profits to their masters. The female slaves were ideal for the domestic chores in the compound and sexual activities for their masters. Slaves were seen as prostitutes. They were objectified sexual objects for their masters and their soldiers, without any questions. The young slaves were misused; they treated the young men as cowherds. They were treated harshly, given very demanding and hard tasks for just a small reward. They were given the minimum food and clothing. The slaves were badly treated and severely punished for their actions. They were often severely beaten for small mistakes. The slaves served as the front line often in war, and the loss of their lives did not have any significance with the roman officers. Daily, the unskilled strong men were trained to become better soldiers before any war arose. Some of the slaves during the roman empire were gladiators. The gladiators fought in publicly organized games that were held in largely-built arenas all over the Roman empire. While some of the gladiators were free men, most of them were slaves, fighting for the entertainment of the people. The slaves were trained to fight with the sword, knives, spear, and other weapons in the arena. The best gladiators were given special treatment with their masters, as they were expected to fight in the main events, like if the empower was going to visit the arena. 10. Based on Siculus’ account, how would you describe the moral character or values of the slave masters (men like Damophilus of Enna, for example)? How did his slaves feel about him? They were morally corrupt. They acted as though the slaves weren’t human and were simply put on this earth to work for them. Their slaves hated them and that is why they revolted . The slaves were reduced to the level of brutes, and conspired to revolt. The masters had already suffered a loss of moral character for mistreating the slaves. Seneca's writings had a virtuous tone and he urged for humane slave treatment. 11. Do you think that the slaves were justified to revolt? Once they seized control, do you think the slaves proved that they were better (or more moral) people than their masters had been? I believe that the slaves were completely justified to revolt but they ended up proving that they were no better than their captors when they started the ruthless killing of innocent people. Revenge did not have to be a slaughter to prove a point
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