patient and his or hers autonomy which physicians must respect even if it

Patient and his or hers autonomy which physicians

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patient and his or hers autonomy which physicians must respect even if it contradicts the principles of beneficence. Justice has the obligation of providing anyone with what he or she deserve and owed, such as treating people fairly, equally, and impartially (Gracyk, 2012). Physicians must be impartial in treating patients and protecting individual rights.
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Conclusion Refusal to accept blood makes some operations more dangerous and causes some doctors considerable anxiety. Ethical dilemma can exist if the patients’ rights come to a conflict with the health care's providers professional medical advice. This often happen with a Jehovah Whiteness refusing blood transfusions because of religion. The physician must respect him or hers religion and decide a different alternative to provide care without the blood transfusion. The practitioners should also treat his patients with respect and honesty. These joint standards are upheld to protect the patient from abuse and uphold quality Health care. Health professionals also have to make sure patients are treated equal they are not to treat anyone different regardless of race, age, and ethnicity. The health professional has to think of the aspects of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice before providing any care for the patient. References: Jehovah's Witnesses and blood transfusions. (n.d.). Retrieved September 26, 2015, from Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia website: %27s_Witnesses_and_blood_transfusions Keller, E. J., Kwo, P. Y., & Helft, P. R. (2014). Ethical considerations surrounding survival benefit-based liver allocation. Liver Transplantation: Official Publication Of The American Association For The Study Of Liver Diseases And The International Liver Transplantation Society , 20 (2), 140-146. doi:10.1002/lt.23780 Gracyk, T. (2012, February 3). Four Fundamental Ethical Principles. Four Fundamental Ethical Principles . Retrieved September 26, 2015, from web.mnstate.edu/gracyk/courses/phil %20115/Four_Basic_principles.htm
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