290 Using the model an example of the different concepts are below Perceived

290 using the model an example of the different

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Wills, 2011, p. 290). Using the model, an example of the different concepts are below: Perceived susceptibility – Does a middle-age woman with a family history of breast cancer believe that she is susceptible? Perceived severity – She realizes that her grandmother died of breast cancer. Perceived benefits – She has been educated and knows that yearly mammograms help reduce deaths from breast cancer. Perceived barriers – Her insurance does not cover the expense of the mammogram. Cues to action – She becomes aware after reading the newspaper that low-cost mammography is offered at a nearby hospital. Self-efficacy – She makes an appointment for a mammogram. Reference McEwen, M., & Wills, E. (2011). Theoretical Basis for Nursing (3rd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Reply | Quote & Reply Oct 14, 2015 11:36 PM 0 Like Substantive Post John Sebastian 8 posts Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 1 A nurse in the department ripped open the curtain to the room next door where a very young man had expired from a massive heart attack after a similar experience. She proceeded to tell the patient this is going to be him if he kept on the path he was on. I think that while the scare tactic may have been harsh, I would support the nurse's decision to show the consequences of the teenager's actions. Sometimes, a medical professional has to use unorthodox strategies to reach the patient.
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That's crazy to hear. I hope seeing that worked out for the boy, because scare tactics usually don't work. I found an article by Kandula and Wynia (2015) stating that scare tactics like those are rarely helpful, especially when dealing with chronic illnesses. Luckily, since the patient was first time user, it's a lot easier for the teenage patient to stop IV drugs after the first time, rather than having him undergo a difficult lifestyle change like a diet. Would you ever consider trying to scare someone into changing their habits? Why or why not? References Kandula, M. & Wynia, M. (2015, May 29). Fear-based medicine: Using scare tactics in the clinical encounter. Retrieved from - using-scare-tactics-in-the-clinical-encounter/ EDIT: Supported the nurse's tactics and added an open-ended question. Did I do this right? Reply | Quote & Reply Oct 14, 2015 11:46 PM 0 Like Substantive Post John Sebastian 8 posts Re:Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 1 I think that knowing early the barriers to lifestyle modification education is important because it makes teaching more efficient. By giving the patient information that cannot be utilized, the patient may feel overwhelmed, and as a result feel a sense of hopelessness in their power of self-care. Rather, the nurse should assess how the patient functions and collaborate with him/her from their. Not only does it reduce the effort of teaching, this method would empower the patient as well.
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