When treating for internal and external parasites all birds should be treated

When treating for internal and external parasites all

This preview shows page 55 - 57 out of 164 pages.

When treating for internal and external parasites, all birds should be treated at the same time. These activities need to be documented in the appropriate records. When using vaccines, drenches, external parasite control chemicals or any other animal care chemicals, care must be taken and noted about the following: reading all labels maintaining appropriate storage adhering to withholding periods determining the weight of animals determining the correct dose rate using protective clothing if required. Oral medications to be administered include worming compounds and vitamin and mineral supplements. They may be administered in the feed or water depending on instructions. If water-based treatments are to be used, water is generally withdrawn from birds overnight to increase their thirst. Avoid water withdrawal during the day, particularly in hot weather. Drink containers need to be suitably anchored to prevent tipping. 4. Beak trimming (Category 4): This is usually not necessary in ducks and geese. Refer to the Code of Practice for the welfare of Animals, Domestic Poultry 4th Edition for information about bill trimming for ducks and geese. 5. Slaughter of livestock (Category 5) 55
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FROGS AND TOADS (INCLUDING TADPOLES) This species specific guideline is a guide only and was accurate at the time of publication. Staff responsible for animals in schools should refer to the ACT Code of Practice for the welfare of animals to ensure that current ACT legislation is followed. The relevant code of practice was viewed on 1 March 2018 at: The importance of good stockmanship in animal welfare cannot be over-emphasised. Persons responsible for the care of animals should be well trained, experienced and dedicated. Staff should be encouraged to undertake appropriate training in animal management and husbandry appropriate to the species being kept in schools. Knowledge of the normal appearance and behaviour of their animals is essential for them to be treated effectively and efficiently and with consideration. Varietal range difference There are five quite different families of frogs: Tree frogs (family Hylidae) Southern frogs: ground dwelling (family Myobatrachidae) Narrow mouthed frogs (family Microhylidae) True frogs (family Ranidae) True toads (family Bufonidae) It is illegal to take frogs or tadpoles from the wild in the ACT or move them from one water body to another. The Frogwatch ACT and Region program offers the loan of a complete Tadpole Kit so students can observe the amazing process of tadpoles going through metamorphoses. Alternatively, schools and other institutions can apply for a permit to take frogs or tadpoles from the wild for study purposes. When two tadpoles have metamorphosed into frogs, they should be returned, with the remaining tadpoles, to the place from where they were initially collected. If the environment conditions are not suitable for the species being kept, the tadpoles may never metamorphose into frogs.
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