Due september 27 th 2017 kayla karbonik condition is

This preview shows page 3 - 4 out of 4 pages.

Due: September 27 th , 2017 Kayla Karbonik condition is the UCLA Loneliness Scale, a series of 20 questions that all begin with this formulation: “How often do you feel ...?” As in: “How often do you feel that you are ‘in tune’ with the people around you?” And: “How often do you feel that you lack companionship?” Measuring the condition in these terms, various studies have shown loneliness rising drastically over a very short period of recent history. A 2010 AARP survey found that 35 percent of adults older than 45 were chronically lonely, as opposed to 20 percent of a similar group only a decade earlier. The new studies on loneliness are beginning to yield some surprising preliminary findings about its mechanisms. (1) People who are married are less lonely than single people, one journal article suggests, but only if their spouses are confidants. If one’s spouse is not a confidant, marriage may not decrease loneliness. A belief in God might help, or it might not (evidence) , as a 1990 German study comparing levels of religious feeling and levels of loneliness discovered. Loneliness and being alone are not the same thing, but both are on the rise (Loneliness and being alone are on the rise) – Argues that . We meet fewer people. We gather less. And when we gather, our bonds are less meaningful and less easy (It is a statement that is being explained and an conclusion). The decrease in confidants—that is, in quality social connections— has been dramatic (Conclusion but it has not been explained) over the past 25 years. In one survey, the mean size of networks of personal confidants decreased from 2.94 people in 1985 to 2.08 in 2004. Similarly, in 1985, only 10 percent of Americans said they had no one with whom to discuss important matters, and 15 percent said they had only one such good friend. By 2004, 25 percent had nobody to talk to, and 20 percent had only one confidant. In the face of this social disintegration, we have essentially hired an army of replacement confidants, ( an entire class of professional careers. As Ronald Dworkin pointed out in a 2010 paper for the Hoover Institution, in the late ’40s, the United States was home to 2,500 clinical psychologists, 30,000 social workers, and

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture