Use exercises that directly load particular regions

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Use exercises that directly load particular regions of the skeleton. Use structural exercises to direct force vectors through the spine and hip and allow the use of greater absolute loads in training. Overload the musculoskeletal system, and progressively increase the load as the tissues become accustomed to the stimulus. Vary exercise selection to change the distribution of the force vectors to continually present a unique stimulus. Adaptations of Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia to Anaerobic Training The primary stimulus for growth of tendons, ligaments, and fascia is the mechanical forces created during exercise. The degree of tissue adaptation is proportional to the intensity of exercise. Consistent anaerobic exercise that exceeds the threshold of strain stimulates connective tissue changes.
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Adaptations of Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia to Anaerobic Training Sites where connective tissues can increase strength and load-bearing capacity are at the junctions between the tendon (and ligament) and bone surface, within the body of the tendon or ligament, and in the network of fascia within skeletal muscle. Adaptations of Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia to Anaerobic Training Specific tendinous changes that contribute to size and strength increases include an increase in collagen fibril diameter, a greater number of covalent cross-links within the hypertrophied fiber, an increase in the number of collagen fibrils, and an increase in the packing density of collagen fibrils. How can athletes stimulate connective tissue adaptations? Tendons, ligaments, fascia Exercise of low to moderate intensity does not markedly change the collagen content of connective tissue. High-intensity loading results in a net growth of the involved connective tissues. Forces should be exerted throughout the full range of motion of a joint. Cartilage Adaptations to Anaerobic Training The main functions of cartilage are to provide a smooth joint articulating surface, act as a shock absorber for forces directed through the joint, and aid in the attachment of connective tissue to the skeleton. Cartilage Adaptations to Anaerobic Training Cartilage lacks its own blood supply and must depend on diffusion of oxygen and nutrients from synovial fluid. Movement about a joint creates changes in pressure in the joint capsule that drive nutrients from the synovial fluid toward the articular cartilage of the joint.
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  • Fall '18
  • Dr. Kullman

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