Empowering Children Children have a right to be heard and have their concerns

Empowering children children have a right to be heard

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Empowering Children – Children have a right to be heard and have their concerns and ideas taken seriously. 3. What is mandatory reporting? Provide an example of when you would be required to follow this requirement.
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Mandatory reporting refers to the legal requirement of certain professional groups to report a reasonable belief of child physical or sexual abuse, and severe neglect to child protection authorities. In Victoria mandated reporters must make a report to child protection, if: A child who has suffered or is likely to suffer significant harm as a result of physical injury or sexual abuse, and the child’s parents have not protected, or are unlikely to protect the child from harm of that type. The report must be made as soon as practicable after forming the belief and after each occasion on which they become aware of any further reasonable grounds for the belief. NOTE: You do not have to prove that abuse occurred to report!!! The law does not require proof!!! The law requires that you report suspected abuse!!!!! 4. Provide a description of trauma informed care and how it applies to working with children and young people at risk. Trauma-informed care could be described as a framework for human service delivery that is based on knowledge and understanding of how trauma affects peoples lives and their service needs. Children exposed to complex trauma can experience lifelong problems that place them at risk of further difficulties, including psychiatric and addictive disorders, chronic medical illnesses and legal, vocational, and family problems. These difficulties may extend from childhood through adolescence and into adulthood. 5. List 3 signs or symptoms that might indicate the following types of abuse in children or young people. Physical: Broken bones, bone fractures or dislocations. Lacerations, burns/scalds, or welts in various stages. Bite marks and unexplained bruises. A child or young person can’t explain an injury, or the explanation is inconsistent, vague or unlikely. A child or young person seems frightened of a parent or carer or seems afraid to go home. Sexual: Inappropriate knowledge about sex for their age. Inappropriate sexual behaviour for their age and development level. Pain or bleeding in the anal or genital area accompanied by redness and swelling.
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Emotional: Eating hungrily or hardly at all. Highly anxious, self-critical or depressed. A child or young person shows extremes in behaviour from aggressive to passive. 6. a) Provide an example of how a child or young person might disclose abuse using the following types of disclosure. Direct Disclosure: - Direct Disclosure is when a child or young person will tell you directly that they are being abused, they might begin with one example and see how you react. Indirect Disclosure: - Indirect Disclosure is when a child or young person do not tell you directly, but they communicate what they have experienced indirectly – through their behaviours, emotions, art, writing, appearance, inquiries or discussions about fears, concerns or relationships.
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