11 arrange for someone to attend the meeting with you

This preview shows page 2 out of 2 pages.

11. Arrange for someone to attend the meeting with you, if you like. 12. You are allowed to tape the meeting. Many parents find this helpful for future reference. If you plan to tape the meeting, it can be helpful to politely notify the school in advance that you are going to do so. DURING THE IEP MEETING 1. Remember that you are an equal member of the IEP team. 2. Ask to review the current IEP (if there is one). Talk about which teaching methods and materials worked and which did not. Discuss what approaches you feel will assist your child in learning. 3. Be sure you understand the words used in the IEP and in the meeting, all the test results, and any new goals that are suggested. Compare the school’s goals with your goals. Ask for clarification if you need to, and ask about the impli- cations of what is said in the meeting. Take notes, and read back your notes to other members of the IEP team on any critical issues to ensure mutual understanding. 4. Be prepared to listen to others’ points of view, and be sure your views are heard. Be assertive, but stay calm. 5. Remember that services are based on individual need, not availability. If needed services are not available, be sure that this is stated on the IEP form, as well as when the services will be made available. Services and assistive tech- nology must be provided even if not currently available in your child’s school. Remember that services must be pro- vided in the least restrictive setting appropriate for your child. 6. Discuss the amount of special education and regular education your child requires. 7. Write the IEP with goals that you understand and that a teacher and other staff can use to measure progress. How progress will be measured should be clearly stated in the IEP. 8. The IEP should include any accommodations and changes to your child’s regular education classes that may be needed, including both physical and academic accom- modations (e.g., assistive technology, homework and test- ing accommodations). AT THE END OF THE IEP MEETING 1. Make sure that all blanks and spaces in the IEP form are filled in.
Image of page 2
  • Spring '12
  • Jackson
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, IEP, Individualized Education Program

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern