Antecedent The word or group of words to which a pronoun refers or replaces All

Antecedent the word or group of words to which a

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Antecedent - The word or group of words to which a pronoun refers or replaces. All pronouns must agree with their antecedents. A pronoun must agree with its antecedent in number (singular or plural) and gender (masculine, feminine, or neuter). Ex: Consuela won her fifth grade spelling bee. Ex: Jacob took his grandfather to the doctor. A pronoun must agree in person with its antecedent. Ex: They swam to the far shore, where they could find shells. Singular personal pronoun -Is used when the antecedent is a singular indefinite pronoun. Ex: Each of the girls on the team has her own shin pads. Plural personal pronoun - Is used when the antecedent is a plural indefinite pronoun. Ex: Both of the dogs lost their collars.
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Singular indefinite pronouns- Anybody, anyone, anything, each, either, everybody, everyone, everything, one, other, somebody. Plural indefinite pronouns- several, both, few, many. Singular or plural indefinite pronouns- Some, all, any, most, none. Unit 9: Positive modifier - Cannot be used to make a comparison. (This is the form that appears as the entry word in a dictionary.) Ex: The chicken enchiladas are spicy . (adjective) Maple trees grow slowly . (adverb) good, well, well, badly, far (distance), far (degreem time), little (amount). Comparative modifiers - Shows two things being compared. Ex: The chicken enchiladas are spicier than the cheese ones. (adjective) Maple trees grow more slowly than poplars. (adverb) Better, worse, farther, less, more. Superlative modifiers - Shows three or more things being compared. Ex: The chicken enchiladas are the spiciest . (adjective) Of these trees, the maple grows most slowly . (adverb) Best, worst, furthest, least, most. Incomplete comparison- Do not make and incomplete comparison by omitting other or else when you compare one member of a group to another. Unclear: The Labrador retriever is the larger than any dog in the kennel. Clear: The Labrador retriever is larger than any other dog in the kennel. *Always use good as an adjective. Well may be used as an adverb of manner telling how ably something is done or as an adjective meaning “in good health”. Double negative - Never use a double negative or two negative words in the same clause. Use only one negative work to express a negative idea. Incorrect: I didn’t but no magazines. Correct: I didn’t buy any magazines. Misplaced modifier- Modifies the wrong word or seems to modify more than one word in a sentence. To correct a misplaced modifier, move the modifier as close as possible to the word that it modifies. Misplaced: I want to buy a computer for my mother with a modem. Clear: I want to buy a computer with a modem for my mother. Dangling modifier - Does not logically modify any word in the sentence. To correct a dangling modifier, supply a word that the dangling modifier can logically modify. Dangling: Waiting for a ride home, rain started to fall. (Was the rain waiting for a ride home?) Clean dangling: While I was waiting for a ride home, rain started to fall.
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  • Fall '19
  • Syntactic entities, Gerund

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