What were the two principal positions in the domestic debate over the degree to

What were the two principal positions in the domestic

This preview shows page 27 - 29 out of 74 pages.

18. What were the two principal positions in the domestic debate over the degree to which the United States should participate in the European war?Here is the answer. The two
Image of page 27
19. How did the Lend-Lease program work? What was the basis of the national debate over this Act?It authorized the president to transfer arms or any other defense materials for which Congress appropriated money to “the government of any country whose defense the President deems vital to the defense of the United States.” By allowing the transfer of supplies without compensation to Britain, China, the Soviet Union and other countries, the act permitted the United States to support its war interests without being overextended in battle. 20. What was the shape of our military readiness at the outbreak of war in Europe in the fall of 1939? What did President Roosevelt and Congress do to enhance our potential military capabilities?Why did President Roosevelt propose the Lend-Lease Program in 1941?to send aid to the Allies in Europe 21.Why was the Atlantic Charter important? What principles did it establish? The Atlantic Charter was a pivotal policy statement issued on 14 August 1941, which defined the Allies goals for the post-war world. The Charter was drafted by the leaders of the U.S. & U.K. aboard the U.S.S. ... no territorial gains were to be sought by the United States or the United Kingdom. 22. How did the US enter into an undeclared shooting war with Germany in the fall of 1941?President Roosevelt granted the navy permission for U.S. warships to attack German U-boats in selfdefense 23. Why was oil a major source of conflict between the US and Japan in the early 1940s? 24. Why were we caught so off guard at Pearl Harbor on the morning of December 7, 1941?"Nobody expects the Spanish inquisition," Monty Python pointed out in a series of absurd sketches. In reality, many of history's most world-changing events relied on the element of surprise. On December 7, 1941, the unexpected invasion of Pearl Harbor propelled the U.S. into World War II.
Image of page 28
Image of page 29

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 74 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture