See eg David Broder Term Limits Juggernaut May Flatten Some Unintended Victims

See eg david broder term limits juggernaut may

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See, e.g, David Broder, Term-Limits Juggernaut May Flatten Some Unintended Victims, CH. TRID., Oct. 17, 1991, § 1, at 27 (op-ed) ("Fed by the fury at the Senate's late-night pay raise, the House check-bouncing scandal and even the gruesome Clarence Thomas hearings, the term-limits movement is running ... strongly .... ); William Neikirk, Poisonous Politics Erodes Citizens' Faith, CHI. TRIB., Oct. 13, 1991, § 1, at 1, 4 ("Term limitation, once considered a fringe idea, gains in political respectability with each new scandal or with each new failure by Congress and the Bush administration to deal with pressing domestic issues .... "); William Safire, Hail to the House, N.Y. TIMES, Oct. 7, 1991 (nat'l ed.), at Al 3 (op-ed) ("Term limitation is the specter that is haunting the House, and scandal is the two-by-four that gets the attention of the most mulish
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2 DEPAUL LAW RE VIEW [Vol. 41:1 list fervor and its accompanying debate on editorial pages across America, over 96% of both House and Senate incumbents were reelected in 1990.5 Many people still believe that some sort of congressional election reform is necessary. 6 Voters seem to love their individual representatives while they hate Congress. This ambivalent relationship between Congress and the people reveals a sense that our government has a deep, systemic problem, but both Congress and the people lack the will to do anything about it. Without diminishing its importance, the popular "feeling" that Congress is inept is not enough to justify a radical change such as limiting congressional terms. A more rational and deliberate dialogue is needed to muster deep and broad popular support to change the Constitution. Indeed, to consider limiting congressional tenure is to consider changing the very legal and institutional framework by which laws themselves are made. Such a proposal should be approached earnestly and thoughtfully by both the "everyday" people of America and the political and intellectual elite. 7 This Article is intended as a step in the direction of a rational dialogue about term limits, and contains three stages. Part I lays the interpretive foun- dation for an institutional analysis of Congress by exploring the theoretical underpinnings of representative legislation. The Constitution will be explored textually and historically to discover Congress' original constitutional man- date. Part I will argue that the Constitution requires representative legislation to reflect two fundamental principles: legitimacy, meaning that members of Congress should meet several normative selection criteria; and effectiveness, meaning that legislation should occur in a procedural framework of legitimacy and deliberation to create policy that embodies the national interest. 8 member."). 5. Chuck Alston, Warning Shots Fired by Voters More Mood Than Moderate, 48 CONG.
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