An excerpt from the article which he said there is no

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whites. An excerpt from the article which he said “There is no rivalry, no competition to get employment among slaves, as among free laborers. Nor is there a war between master and slave. The masters interest prevents his reducing the slaves allowance or wages in infancy or sickness, for he might lose the slave by so doing. His feeling for his slave never permits him to stint him in old age. The slaves are all well fed, well clad, have plenty of fuel, and are happy”. George Fitzhugh Argues that Slavery is Better than Liberty and Equality, 1854. (n.d.). Retrieved from - better-than-liberty-and-equality-1854/
1860 Republican Party Platform The 1860 Republican Party convention in Chicago created a platform that clearly opposed the expansion of slavery in the West and the reopening of the slave trade. However, nothing in the document claimed that the government had the power to eliminate slavery where it already existed. Controversies over slavery suffuse the platform, but maybe even more noticeable is the importance of the West to the Republican Party. They wanted to make Kansas a state, open up the railroad to the Pacific and that the federal government ought to render immediate and efficient aid in its construction; and that, as preliminary thereto, a daily overland mail should be promptly established, they also wanted to abolish slavery, that we brand the recent reopening of the African slave trade, under the cover of our national flag, aided by perversions of judicial power, as a crime against humanity and a burning shame to our country and age; and we call upon Congress to take prompt and efficient measures for the total and final suppression of that execrable traffic. 1860 Republican Party Platform. (n.d.). Retrieved from - sectional-crisis/1860-republican-party-platform/ South Carolina Declaration of Secession, 1860 Abraham Lincoln won the 1860 contest on November 6 with just 40% of the popular vote and not a single southern vote in the Electoral College. Within days, southern states were organizing secession conventions. On December 20, South Carolina voted to secede, and issued its “Declaration of the Immediate Causes.” An official secession convention met in South Carolina following the November 1860 election of

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