To uruk and addresses the king ishtar offers to make

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to Uruk and addresses the king. Ishtar offers to make Gilgamesh wealthy, his kingdom fertile, and respected by all people in the world. All he will have to do is agree to be Ishtar’s husband. However, Gilgamesh does not fall into her snare. His answer shows Gilgamesh is aware of his limitations and also mindful of Ishtar’s nature. He recites a list of Ishtar’s former lovers and the wretched ends they met when they inevitably failed to please the goddess. With this solid sense of self, the King of Uruk spurns Ishtar and the future she offers because he knows whatever delights she provides will be short-lives but her unavoidable wrath will be catastrophic. Coming into this knowledge gives the reader a hint of the great king Gilgamesh can become as long as he stays focused. The encounter with Ishtar proves he can be a clever hero since he is not seduced by the offer of an easy life. v. Various aspects of the goddess figure, as understood by Campbell, are present at different times and in different characters in the texts. The creative and beneficial features of the cosmic feminine principle are evident in the priestess Shamhat and tavern keeper Shiduri. The dangerous side of the goddess is represented in the fickle, destructive goddess Ishtar. b. The Code of Hammurabi i. Marriage was still done through the purchase of a bride with a bride's price and a dowry. This infers the notion that women are merchandise to be bought and sold from father to suitor. For instance, not only was the wife expected to be a maid-servant to her husband, but if her husband wishes he could force her to serve her mother-in-law, or even his first wife. This establishes the idea that a woman is subservient to her husband.
ii. There were laws that governed a wife's behavior as well. Women deemed bad wives would suffer severe consequences. If a woman was a "bad wife," her husband could have her sent away while keeping her children and her dowry. Another option for bad wives would be for their husbands to make them slaves in their own households. A woman was allowed to file suit if her husband treated her cruelly or neglected her; however, she could only get a judicial separation there was no punishment for his behavior towards her. iii. if a woman could not bear her husband any children, she was expected to provide him with a maid who could provide the husband with children. The maid was in no way a wife, and any children she gave birth to were immediately turned over to the husband and his wife. This maid was then at the hands of the wife and could be degraded to slavery. iv. a woman never really left the control of her father. A father had strict control over his daughters. A father could choose his daughter's future. Sometimes a father could choose for his daughter to live a life of celibacy as a Vestal Virgin. As a Vestal Virgin, she was free to marry but she could never bear children. A father could also make other decisions for his daughter such as offer her services to particular gods, vestals, and others. v.

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