But anyway dont get paranoid about cleaning your whole house Ive had people

But anyway dont get paranoid about cleaning your

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enough to find their way to a child's head before they starve! But anyway, don't get paranoid about cleaning your whole house! I've had people tell me they have cleaned (or replaced!) the drapes, dismantled a canopy bed, ruined clothes by washing them (when they were supposed to have been dry-cleaned!) just because they wanted to 'make sure', sprayed a lot of pesticide all around their house, had the rugs professionally cleaned, etc. Just try to focus on items that have recently touched the hair of an infested person. That should be good enough... remember, lice live on people, not on things! Why Do They Re-Occur? Four most likely reasons: (1) You didn't kill all the lice and remove all the nits on the infested person(s) the first time around, (2) you didn't get them out of your environment, (3) you got reinfested from someone or somewhere else, or (4) you've been infested by 'resistant 'lice. Most people want to believe in the number 3 or 4 reasons, but the problem is more likely to be traceable either to not getting viable nits out of the person's hair after initial treatment (and then they hatch after a week
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or so) or to some failure to remove all lice or nits from the home environment (did you forget to wash the bed linens?). Sometimes people report that they are having a lot of trouble getting rid of the beasts even though they say they are doing all the proper things (treating the child, removing nits, checking the environment, etc. some of the 'things' aren't being done in the most consistent manner. For instance, it's not unusual for parents to treat the child's hair to kill all the lice, but then allow the child to go to sleep that night on the same bed linens that were used the night before. In a situation like that, any lice that had crawled off the child's head onto the sheet or pillowcase the previous night, could very easily crawl back on and start the problem all over again, even though the treatment had actually been effective in killing all the lice that were on the child's head at the time. Anyone who comes in close contact with someone who already has head lice, contaminated clothing, and other belongings. Preschool and elementary-age children, 3-10, and their families are infested most often. Girls get head lice more often than boys, women more than men. In the United States, African- Americans rarely get head lice. What do head lice look like? There are three forms of lice: the nit, the nymph, and the adult. Nit: Nits are head lice eggs. They are hard to see and are often confused for dandruff or hair spray droplets. Nits are found firmly attached to the hair shaft. They are oval and usually yellow to white. Nits take about 1 week to hatch. Nymph: The nit hatches into a baby louse called a nymph. It looks like an adult head louse, but is smaller. Nymphs mature into adults about 7 days after hatching. To live, the nymph must feed on blood. Adult: The adult louse is about the size of a sesame seed, has six legs, and is tan to greyish- white. In persons with dark hair, the adult louse will look darker. Females lay nits; they are usually larger than males. Adult lice can live up to 30 days on a
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  • Summer '14
  • Head louse, Facial hair, Pediculosis, Body louse, Crab louse, Louse

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