P Walterstorff Also deeply embedded in a Christian worldview is the conviction

P walterstorff also deeply embedded in a christian

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Peace,” by N.P. Walterstorff).Also, deeply embedded in a Christian worldview is the conviction that the requirement to do justice is rooted in the requirement to respect the image of God in persons.Over and again the Old Testament indicates that the targets of God’s concern for justice include “the orphan and the widow, and…the alien [or sojourner, i.e. a foreigner living among the Israelites]” (e.g. Dt 10:18, 24:17-18). In a Christian worldview, justice is intimately connected with the fate of the poor, the weak, the oppressed, the disenfranchised. To establish justice means to see after the welfare of all the marginalized within it, giving them a voice and a fair share of goods (New Dictionary of Christian Ethics and Pastoral Theology, 1995 ed., s.v. “Justice and Peace,” by N.P. Walterstorff). In a Christian worldview, should this be carried out on by Christian individuals and churches, or does it call for a society to secure justice for all by taking property from certain of its members against their will (in the form of taxes) and giving it to the impoverished for their sustenance? What about the global community? Does his commitment to justice demand that a Christian oppose and work to eliminate oppressive structural evils wherever they are found?32. How does a Christian work for justice? Pray for justice to be done. Gather and share knowledge about injustice(s). Adopt lifestyle choices that reflect concern and model what others should do to resolve injustice, i.e. ride a bicycle instead of drive a car, or live among the poor in Manila. Address moral problems through political means, i.e. organize, vote, write letters, lobby, demonstrate, contribute to political causes, or run for office.From a Christian perspective, any movement that seeks to eliminate racial [or class] injustice among men, and at the same time to avoid perpetrating a fresh injustice, is in the favor of God. The righting of an ancient wrong must not inflict new, unfair hardships on the descendants of those who did the original wrong (Wirt 81). 33. From a Christian point of view, what about crime and punishment?
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