Her person was the image of her mind her hazel eyes although as lively as a

Her person was the image of her mind her hazel eyes

This preview shows page 9 - 11 out of 11 pages.

Her person was the image of her mind; her hazel eyes, although as lively as a bird’s, possessed an attractive softness. Her figure was light and airy; and, though capable of enduring great fatigue, she appeared the most fragile creature in the world” (20). Frankenstein describes her to be perfect; without any flaws whatsoever. Clearly by
Image of page 9
Pregont 10 looking at the way Elizabeth is described in Frankenstein , she represents the perfect maiden found in Gothic literature. Lastly, a final important component of Gothic literature seen in Frankenstein is the reference to religion. This can be found after the Monster reads Paradise Lost, a poem about the fall of man. The Monster tells Victor Frankenstein of the poem’s effect on him, saying, “I often referred the several situations, as their similarity struck me, to my own. Like Adam, I was created apparently united by no link to any other being in existence; but his state was far different from mine in every other respect” (104-105). The Monster is comparing himself to Adam and Victor Frankenstein to God. By doing this, the Monster creates a religious reference. This example is an excellent demonstration of how Frankenstein uses religion references, a common theme of Gothic literature. By combining this religious reference with use of the supernatural and a perfect maiden, it is clear to see that Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein uses many characteristics of Gothic Literature. Again, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein truly is a legendary work of writing. From the horrific creation of the Monster to the death of Victor Frankenstein, the book makes for a highly enjoyable read. But by taking a more in-depth look at Frankenstein , studying the themes of Gothic literature, and reading Bram Stoker’s Dracula , one can truly have a deeper appreciation for the novel as they can recognize Victor Frankenstein and the Monster’s experience with nature and technology, how they collide, Frankenstein ’s similarity to Stoker’s Dracula , and Frankenstein ’s uses of common elements of Gothic literature.
Image of page 10
Pregont 11 Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein . Lackington, 1818. Stoker, Bram, and Jack Kelly. Dracula . Baronet Books, 2008. Miller, Terri Beth. “Gothic Elements in Frankenstein.” Study.com , Study.com, study.com/academy/lesson/gothic-elements-in-frankenstein.html.
Image of page 11

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 11 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture