2 speak in personal terms whenever possible when many

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2. Speak in personal terms whenever possible. When many people have worked on developing a new product or adopting a new policy, it becomes difficult for the executive to say "I."
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3. It you do not want some statement quoted, do not make it. Spokespersons should avoid talking "off the record," because such statements may well wind up published without the source. 4. State the most important fact at the beginning. The executive's format may first list the facts that led to the final conclusion, but such organization will fail when talking with the news media. 5. Do not argue with the reporter or lose your cool. Understand that the journalist seeks an interesting story and will use whatever techniques necessary to obtain it. 6. If a question contains offensive language or simply words you do not like, do not repeat them even to deny them. Reporters often use the gambit of putting words into the subject's mouth. 7. If the reporter asks a direct question, give an equally direct answer. Not giving one is a common error executives are prone to make. 8. If a spokesperson does not know the answer to a question, one should simply say, " I don't know, but I'll find out for you." With this, the spokesperson assumes the responsibility of following through. 9. Tell the truth, even if it hurts. In this era of skepticism and hostility, the most difficult task is often simply telling the truth. 10. Do not exaggerate the facts. Crying wolf makes it harder to be heard next time out. These guidelines simply add up tot he rule that profitable press relations require adherence to the " Five Fs": dealing with journalists and programme producers in a manner that is fast, factual, frank, fair and friendly.
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Courtesy : Pg.No.435, Effective Public Relations 6 th Edition, Scott M.Cutlip, Allen H.Center, Glen M. Brooms Essentials of Good Copy Essentials of good publicity copy are essentials of good news writing. A few reminders can serve as a checklist. Will the information or news really interest the intended audience? Does the information answer every reasonable question that readers or listeners may ask? Is the significance of the information explained in terms of audience? Is the copy sufficiently newsworthy to survive stiff competition for public attention? Will the information further the objectives of our institution? Is it useful? Does the publicity accurately reflect the character and nature of the institution it represents? Are the facts, names, and dates accurate? Are the technical terms explained? Will the lead catch and hold the busy reader's or inattentive viewer's attention? Will it produce a bright, eye-catching headline? Is the lead terse, to the point? Do the facts of the story support the lead in fact and spirit? Is it readable copy, stripped of superlatives? Good news copy must be curt, clear, concise.
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