Criminology Lecture Notes2

Anger is a motivating factor for criminal activity

Info icon This preview shows pages 4–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
. Anger is a motivating factor for criminal activity . Adaptations to (coping strategies for) strain . Cognitive Coping Strategy (convincing yourself that you are not strained) (includes ritualists and retreatists) . Ignore/minimize the importance of adversity . Give up on the goal after you don’t achieve it (justify not getting it by saying you didn’t want it)
Image of page 4

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
. Maximize positive outcomes/minimize negative outcomes . Looking at the positive outcomes (got far enough) – see what’s good in the situation . Ex. Downward comparisons – you’re a loser but there are bigger losers than you . Look on the bright side of life and you wont be strained . Accept responsibility for adversity . Accept responsibility for your own failure – mea culpa (its all my fault) . If it’s my fault, then I am responsible for my state of life, therefore, I can change things to not cause myself adversity again . Behavioral coping strategies (innovation and rebellion are versions of behavioral coping) . Maximizing positive outcomes/minimizing negative outcomes . Vengeful behavior . Deal with it through vengeance because others . If I cant have nice things like that, then you shouldn’t either – whenever I vandalize yours then the world seems fair . Emotional Coping strategies . Ex. Meditate, work out, . Ex. Illegitimate ways – alcohol, drugs . Agnew gives us a GENERAL theory – Strain does not explain all crime . Explains both legitimate conforming behavior and illegitimate conforming behavior . Commit crime because they cannot cope . Developed theory by looking at delinquent boys . Crime rates: 79% men and 19% women . Men often experience strain at work when in competition with other men . Women often receive strain from relationships – they want to preserve relationships and because they want to preserve relationships, they often deal with strain in emotional ways (have adverse affects with women – drug/alcohol abuse, eating disorders, mental disorders) Lecture 2/22/2012 . Social Ecology: Shaw and McKay . Social ecology is not about people, but places – places determine how people in those places behave and if they create delinquency and crime . Not race/and ethnicity – it’s how their social/material environment is organized . Developed in Chicago by Urban Sociologist Robert Park . Can study sociology as if they’re ecosystems . Ernest Burgess . All cities are laid out in concentric zones (each about 2 miles wide) . Center is downtown . Outside is zone in transition (houses/factories) . Cities grow from their centers outward . Outside working zone is homes and zone 5 = residential zones . Zone 2 – lots of social disruption, characterized by poverty/disease/social disorganization . Model used by Sean McKay – wanted to chart delinquency rates across cities
Image of page 5
. Moving from the center outward (moving from cities outward) . 28% or more families are on welfare (dark zones) . Monthly rentals rate (property values) . In lighter, inner city areas, property is really cheap . In darker, outer areas of the city, property value is a lot higher – great implications for delinquency .
Image of page 6

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern