and than does research about it and than finds a variety of different and

And than does research about it and than finds a

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and than does research about it, and than finds a variety of different and interesting subjects to base his books off of. In Outliers , Gladwell argues that one person cannot be successful all by himself. It takes many other, uncontrollable aspects (that are more by chance) for that person to reach the top of his field. Gladwell uses a combination of research and anecdotes in order to clearly convey his point to his audience. His familiar and informal style of writing, makes it seem like him and the reader are good buddies, to help the reader relate to him and see what he is talking about. This laid-back type of writing also appeals to the average reader: it not only makes the book easier to understand, unlike more scholarly nonfiction books, but also makes the reader more interested in the topic because he doesn’t have to take so much effort through more prestige language found in other nonfiction works. For example, the author talks specifically to the reader when saying, “Over the course of the chapters ahead, I’m going to introduce you to one kind of outlier after another,” and “We’re going to uncover the secrets of a remarkable lawyer” (Gladwell 17) .This type ostrategy, conversing with the audience on a comfortable and familiar level, helps grab the reader’s attention and keep your interest throughout the book. Malcolm Gladwell also uses a variety of different stories to persuade his audience. These anecdotes give real-life examples of evidence to what he states, while still getting the reader’s attention. There are narratives on a variety of different subjects, from major league Canadian
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hockey to Bill Gates the computer genius. Gladwell’s diversity of stories shows his audience that his theory holds true not just in one case, but in many unrelated circumstances as well. At the end of Outliers, Gladwell states a story about his own family’s rise to success to tie his book together. In an appeal to pathos, he states how his mother rose from Jamaican poverty to become a successful person in Gladwell’s life. The author clearly admires his grandmother, Daisy, for giving his mother a chance at success, and this story goes back to his main idea but now more on a personal level than the other examples like Bill Gates (Gladwell 270). Another of the Gladwells strategies is the way he uses facts found through research. In Chapter One of Outliers,
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