On females the patch is far less pronounced however

Info icon This preview shows pages 6–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
bright red and surrounded by white hair. On females the patch is far less pronounced. However, when in oestrus , the female's patch will brighten, and a "necklace" of fluid-filled blisters forms on the patch. This is thought to be analogous to the swollen buttocks common to most baboons experiencing oestrus. This modification likely came about due to the Gelada's unique mode of feeding - it spends most of its waking hours grazing from an upright sitting position, rump hidden beneath and so unavailable for display. The male Gelada's tail is about as long as the body and densely tufted at the tip; it also has a long and flowing mantle and mane. M. Douc Langur: The Red-shanked Douc characteristically has bright maroon legs and reddish patches around the eyes. In contrast, the Grey-shanked Douc is less vibrant, with speckled grey legs and orange markings on the face. Both have dappled grey bodies, black hands and feet and white cheeks, although the cheek hairs of the Red-shanked Douc are much longer. The Black-shanked Douc has black legs. Their long hind limbs and tail allow these monkeys to be wonderfully agile in their treetop habitat. Prosimians N. Tarsier: Tarsiers are small animals with enormous eyes; each eyeball is approximately 16 mm in diameter and is as large as their entire brain. [6] Tarsiers also have very long hind limbs. In fact, their feet have extremely elongated tarsus bones, from which the animals get their name. The head and body range from 10 to 15 cm in length, but the hind limbs are about twice this long (including the feet), and they also have a slender tail from 20 to 25 cm long. Their fingers are also elongated, with the third finger being about the same length as the upper arm. Most of the digits have nails, but the second and third toes of the hind feet bear claws instead, which are used for grooming. Tarsiers have very soft, velvety fur, which is generally buff, beige, or ochre in color. [7]
Image of page 6

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
O. Silky Sifaka: Sifakas are diurnal and arboreal . Sifakas are medium sized indrids, reaching a length of 45 to 55 cm (about 18-22 in) and a weight of 4 to 6 kg (about 9-13 lbs). Their tail is just as long as their body. Their fur is long and silky, with coloration varying by species from yellowish-white to black brown. The round, hairless face is always black. Sifakas move by vertical clinging and leaping, meaning they maintain an upright position leaping from tree trunk to tree trunk and moving along branches. They are skillful climbers and powerful jumpers, able to make leaps of up to 10 m from one tree to the next. On the ground they move like all indrids with bipedal sideways hopping movements of the hind legs, holding their forelimbs up for balance
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern