Stein concludes thus jesus was not portrayed as

This preview shows page 9 - 12 out of 21 pages.

use of plus the dative. Stein concludes: “Thus Jesus was not portrayed as passively being dragged out by the Evil One to endure temptation, for the initiator of this event was not the devil 1819John Nolland, Luke 1 – 9:20, vol. 35a, Word Biblical Commentary (Dallas: Word, 1989), 178. To avoid the sense of subordination, Nolland’s conclusion, following Conzelmann, is that εν τω πνευματι should be translated“by means of the Spirit” rather than “by the Spirit”.20Young, Intermediate New Testament Greek, 98. 21Daniel B. Wallace, Greek Grammar: Beyond the Basics (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996), 372.
Luke Exegetical paper10but God. The picture is that of the Anointed of the Lord on the offensive and led by the Spirit to confront the devil.”22Third, Luke is emphatic about Jesus’ having fasted for the duration of the 40 days (“And he had eaten nothing in those days,” comp. Matt. 4:2, which simply states that Jesus had “fasted”and was “hungry.” Jesus’ hunger is foregrounded, not merely for the purpose of underscoring his vulnerability to the first temptation to turn a stone into bread, but also to remind the reader that Jesus faces the entire ordeal as a weak human being. The Greek construction in reference to the completion of the 40 days in verse two points forward to its occurrence at the end of the narrative(v. 13) in reference to the Satan’s completion of the temptations.Temptation One: Luke 4:3-4There are two exegetical issues we will consider here: 1) the twice-repeated formula (here and in v. 9) and 2) Jesus’ use of the LXX of Deut. 8:3 here and important textual variant that accompanies it. The clause is calls into question Jesus’ identity as the Royal Son of God publicly designated at his baptism (Luke 3:22). It is the protasis of a conditional clause which introduces the content of the temptation in the apodosis: Wallace lists three different approaches to the understanding of conditional clauses: 1) the structural/formal, which is concerned with the particular particle, moods, and tenses employed in the protasis and apodosis; 2) the semantic, which is concerned with the meaning of the protasis and apodosis and their relation to one another; and finally 3) the pragmatic, which is concerned with what the speaker actually intends to communicate by means of the conditional clause (i.e. veiled threat, request, command, etc.).23We will now examine the conditional clause in relation to the first approach.22Stein, Luke, 145.23Wallace, Greek Grammar, 681.
Luke Exegetical paper11The structural approach.Black notes two basic types of conditional sentence structures: 1) those whose protests contains an indicative verb, and 2) those whose protests contains a non-indicative, or subjunctive, verb.24Clearly, with its use of the indicative (Pres. Ind. 2s.) falls into the first category. This broader category, according to Black, is then subdivided into two subcategories. The first is a “simple condition,” which is often employed when “the speaker assumes the reality of the premise. If the premise is objectively true, “since” rather than “if” is a

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture