Answer true for example if the keys are consecutive

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Answer: TRUE. For example if the keys are consecutive integers. (d) There exists a function f ( n ) such that f ( n ) is Ω( n 2 ) and is O ( n 3 ) but is neither Θ( n 2 ) nor Θ( n 3 ), true or false? Answer: TRUE. For example, f ( n ) = n 2 n or f ( n ) = n 2 log n . (e) There exist undirected graphs on which BFS traversal takes time Θ( | V | ), true or false? Answer: TRUE. For example, if the graph has no edges. (f) We can compute the strongly connected components of a DAG in time O ( | V | ), true or false? Answer: TRUE. In a DAG the strongly connected components consist of single nodes. To compute them just scan the array of nodes. 6
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(g) Let G be a digraph with n nodes and s one of its nodes. The discovery edges found by DFS starting from s always form a tree with n - 1 edges, true or false? Answer: FALSE. They form a tree but the nodes in this tree are only those nodes reachable by a path from s and there may be strictly less than n such nodes, therefore the tree may have strictly less than n - 1 edges. (h) In a 4-way trie we store 3 distinct keys, each of them a 2-character string. The resulting trie can have as many as 22 null links, true or false? Answer: TRUE. The trie is largest of all 3 keys have a different first character. Then there 1 null link from the root, 9 null links from the 3 nodes at depth 1, and 12 null links from the 3 nodes at depth 2. 1 + 9 + 12 = 22. Grading guidelines: As usual: 2 points for correct true or false statement; 3 points for for correct explanation. 9. (20pts) Consider the following undirected weighted graph (five nodes labeled A,B,C,D,E,F and the edge weights are either 1 or 3 as shown). We use Dijkstra’s algorithm to compute the lengths of the shortest paths from A to the other nodes. ! # $ % & ' ( ( ( ( ( ( ) ) ) ) (a) Dijkstra’s algorithm begins by relaxing the edges A-B, A-C and A-D . After these relaxations, what are the distances computed so far from A to B and to C ? Answer: Distance to B is 3. Distance to C is 1. 7
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(b) Which edges does Dijkstra’s algorithm relax in the second round? Answer: C-B, C-D, C-E, C-F . (c) After the second round, what is the distance computed from A to E ? Answer: 4. (d) What is the last edge that needs to be relaxed for the algorithm to finally compute the correct shortest distance from A to E ? Answer: B-E . Grading guidelines: 5pts for each of the 4 parts. For part (b) you lose 1pt for each incorrect edge. 10. (20pts) We define a node r in a digraph G to be “potential root” if for any other node v in G there exists a directed path from r to v . (a) Draw a digraph in which every node is a potential root. Answer: Any directed cycle would do. (b) Draw a digraph without any potential roots. Answer: u-->v<--w (c) Give the pseudocode of an efficient algorithm that takes a digraph as input and finds out whether it has any potential roots. (The more efficient your algorithm, the more points you get.) Answer: Here is a first solution. For each node v we can perform directed DFS starting from v and then count the marked nodes. If there are | V | of them then v is a potential root. This takes time O ( | V | ( | E | + | V | )).
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