6 brings another point the frame does not only need

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materials without falling apart, and a stiff frame means it will not bend. [6] brings another point, the frame does not only need to be light, strong, and stiff. We also need to bring into consideration the air resistance in the car. For that, making the front of the car small and sleek is extremely important. Figure 9: Mousetrap car model. [5] Figure 10: Mousetrap car model. [6] Conclusion: As previously discussed, to build a mousetrap car many aspects need to be in consideration. For instance, if the car needs to be fast, the lever arm has to be short, the wheels small with a larger diameter axle and have a lightweight and stiff frame. In case the car’s main objective is long-distance travel then it is the opposite, the lever arm has to be long, big wheels THE FANTASTIC FOUR 1 0
with smaller diameter axles, and a strong frame that can support all the weight of the car. That is why when building a mousetrap car, you first need to select the circumstances in which the car must work, then select the correct materials and its size to make a mousetrap car that fits perfectly the scenario you are working with. Presentation of Design: When approaching our car, the research that we put into determining which type of car to design was extensive. Since our main objective of the project was to design a car capable of reaching top speeds, we put our research into work as quickly as possible. We used all of the designs/ideas used in our literature review to determine which best, when combined, would help us achieve our goal. The final design that we chose for our competing mousetrap car took advantage of the sturdy and lightweight corrugated cardboard for the frame and wheels, and the velocity effects that having a small diameter wooden axle and a short lever arm provide. Combining these created a mousetrap car that is built and ready for top speeds in any situation. When we came up with our final design, we were very cautious with how we were going to attach each part. We tried to be as precise as possible, to minimize the margin of error. When we were cutting the corrugated cardboard for the frame and wheels of the car, we used a cardboard cutter that didn’t pinch the material, as cutting with scissors would. This made all the cutting a lot smoother for us and the frame was able to be cut to the correct lengths. We didn’t make our base too large, because we wanted the bulk of our car to be the mousetrap. Doing so eliminates unnecessary parts within the system of the car. Even though the base is slightly larger than the mousetrap, we were still able to place it in the backend of the base. As said in the literature review the placement of the mousetrap car matters, and as shown in Figure 4 placing the trap in the back increases the maximum speed the system can carry. We also used the cardboard to make the wheels of our design. Using the same cutting tool, we cut wheels with larger diameters than the axles used to comply with the “smaller axle larger diameter theory” to increase our car’s speed. We also were looking to add rubber bands to the bottom of the wheel to minimize the friction upon the ground and the car.

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