tests such as forced expiratory volume FEV1 can help a clinician determine the

Tests such as forced expiratory volume fev1 can help

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tests such as forced expiratory volume (FEV1) can help a clinician determine the difference between obstructive and restrictive diseases. Specifically, an FEV1 is the forced volume expired in 1 second. In obstructive diseases such as chronic bronchitis and asthma, airway radius is decreased. Thus, FEV1 will Your answer : a. decrease proportionately. Stop & Think Questions: Which muscles contract during quiet expiration? You correctly answered: d. None of these muscles contract during quiet expiration. 6. Minute ventilation is the amount of air that flows into and then out of the lungs in a minute. Minute ventilation (ml/min) = TV (ml/breath) x BPM (breaths/min). Using the values from the second recorded measurement, enter the minute ventilation in the field below and then click Submit Data to record your answer in the lab report. You answered: 7500 ml/min 11. A useful way to express FEV1 is as a percentage of the forced vital capacity (FVC). Using the FEV1 and FVC values from the data grid, calculate the FEV1 (%) by dividing the FEV1 volume by the FVC volume (in this case, the VC is equal to the FVC) and multiply by 100%. Enter the FEV1 (%) for an airway radius of 5.00 mm in the field below and then click Submit Data to record your answer in the lab report.
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  • Fall '13
  • Physiology, thoracic cavity volume, airway radius, forced vital capacity, Calculating Capacities Lab

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