OFFICIAL POLICIES Language In accord with McGill Universitys Charter of

Official policies language in accord with mcgill

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OFFICIAL POLICIES Language : In accord with McGill University’s Charter of Students’ Rights, students in this course have the right to submit in English or in French any written work that is to be graded. This does not apply to courses in which acquiring proficiency in a language is one of the objectives. (Approved by Senate on 21 January 2009 – see also the section in this document on Assignments and Evaluation). Academic Integrity : McGill University values academic integrity. Therefore, all students must understand the meaning and consequences of cheating, plagiarism and other academic offences under the Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedures (see for more information). (Approved by Senate on 29 January 2003). Late Penalties : There will be no extensions for written work unless a student has made prior arrangements with the instructor. There will be a 2% penalty per each day that a piece of graded work is submitted late (inclusive of weekends). Similarly, absence on the day of the mid-term exam is not permitted without prior notice or a doctor’s note. Late submission of conference response papers will not be accepted. COURSE SCHEDULE Week 1: Wednesday, Sept 6 Introduction to the course. Fri, Sept 8 Lecture: Africa – Geography and History Readings Reid, A History of Modern Africa , 2 nd Edition (2012), Ch. 1. 5
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Week 2: Mon, Sept 11 Lecture: Why Study the History of Pre-Colonial Africa? Readings Reid, ‘Past and Presentism,’ Journal of African History , 52, 2 (2011). Wed, Sept 13 Lecture: Writing African History – The Issue of Sources Readings McCall, ‘Introduction,’ in Philips (ed.), Writing African History (2006). Philips, ‘What is African History,’ in Philips (ed.), Writing African History (2006). Falola and Jennings, ‘Introduction,’ in Falola and Jennings (eds.), Sources and Methods in African History (2004). Fri, Sept 15 Lecture: Key Themes 1 - The Idea of Africa Readings Mudimbe, The Invention of Africa (1988), Ch. 1 See also: Said, Orientalism (1979) – Africa is not this text’s central focus, and so it is not a compulsory reading for this course. However, it is an incredibly influential book and it deals with many of the prevalent themes discussed this lecture. I recommend every history student to read it at some point during their undergraduate studies. Week 3: Mon, Sept 18 Lecture: Key Themes 2 – The Environment and the Foundations of African Civilizations Readings Iliffe, Africans: The History of a Continent , 2 nd Edition (2007), Ch. 1. McCann, ‘Ecology and Environment,’ in Parker and Reid (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Modern African History (2013). Tue, Sept 19: Add/Drop Deadline. Wed, Sept 20 Lecture: Key Themes 3 – An African Political Culture? Readings Kopytoff, ‘The Internal African Frontier,’ in Kopytoff (ed.) The African Frontier (1987), especially, pp. 3- 33. Hawthorne, ‘States and Statelessness,’ in Parker and Reid (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Modern African History (2013).
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