of the individual should be a public or civic matter one might support a broad

Of the individual should be a public or civic matter

This preview shows page 99 - 102 out of 332 pages.

of the individual should be a public or civic matter, one might support a broad range of laws and regulations concerning private behavior and belief. Citizens need to understand competing ideas about civic life, politics, and government so that they can make informed judgments about what their government should and should not do, about how they are to live their lives together, and about how to sup- port the proper use of authority and combat the abuse of political power. 1 Defining civic life, politics, and government Students should be able to explain the meaning of the terms civic life, politics, and government. To achieve this standard, students should be able to define and distinguish between private life and civic life private life concerns the personal life of the individual, e.g, being with family and friends, joining clubs or teams, practicing one’s religious beliefs, earning money civic life concerns taking part in the governance of the school, community, tribe, state, or nation, e.g., helping to find solutions to problems, helping to make rules and laws, serving as elected leaders CONTENT STANDARDS 99 5—8 CONTENT STANDARDS
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describe politics as the ways people whose ideas may differ reach agreements that are generally regarded as binding on the group, e.g., presenting information and evidence, stating arguments, negotiating, compromising, voting describe government as the people and institutions with authority to make, carry out, enforce laws, and manage disputes about law define authority as the right, legitimized by custom, law, consent, or principles of morality, to use power to direct or control people identify institutions with authority to direct or control the behavior of members of a society, e.g., a school board, city council, state legislature, courts, Congress define power without authority as power that is not legitimized by custom, law, consent, or principles of morality identify examples of the exercise of power without authority, e.g., a street gang, a military junta, a self-proclaimed dictatorship 100 5—8 CONTENT STANDARDS
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[Without government:] No arts; no letters; no society; and which is worst of all, continual fear and danger of violent death; and the life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short. Thomas Hobbes (1651) 2 Necessity and purposes of government Students should be able to evaluate, take, and defend positions on why government is necessary and the purposes government should serve. To achieve this standard, students should be able to explain major ideas about why government is necessary, e.g., people’s lives, liberty, and property would be inse- cure without government, e.g., there would be no laws to control people’s behavior, the strong might take advantage of the weak individuals by themselves cannot do many of the things they can do collectively, e.g., create a system of highways, provide armed forces for the security of the na- tion, make and enforce laws evaluate competing ideas about the purposes government should serve, e.g., protecting individual rights promoting the common good
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