Thus the protective purpose that repression has also

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Thus, the protective purpose that repression has also gives us side effects, which may cause hindrance. So, how is it different from forgetting? One can over look unimportant information or even the information that is a part of our normal routine life but forgetting important information in the absence of more important aspects is more unconscious in nature. Normal forgotten material can be recalled due to a trigger e.g. I forgot to call the doctor for an appointment; later a phone ring may remind me about the same. Repression is on the other hand unconsciously forgetting an idea, an incident, or an experience. Just a normal / routine trigger may not be enough to recover these repressed memories. Suppression vs Repression Freud mentioned; suppression is generally considered to have more positive results than repression. First, it deals with unpleasant but not extremely contemptible actions or thoughts. It can be a good idea to focus on one thing at a time, suppressing other problems until that one is solved like the wife’s example mentioned above. Counting to ten when angry before taking action is a good example of suppression, this technique is also very useful in everyday life. As an adult the person who has repressed an incident cannot get to this material by a conscious act of will; it’s simply not available. On the other hand, suppressed material can often be recalled, since the act of suppression is more the result of conscious intention.
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Now that we understand repression and suppression both, it is quite clear that both serve a purpose in the short run but may lead to complications in the long run. Now that you have read this article, it is time for you to comment & share your views. Defense Mechanisms In some areas of psychology (especially in psychodynamic theory), psychologists talk about “defense mechanisms,” or manners in which we behave or think in certain ways to better protect or “defend” ourselves. Defense mechanisms are one way of looking at how people distance themselves from a full awareness of unpleasant thoughts, feelings and behaviors.
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Psychologists have categorized defense mechanisms based upon how primitive they are. The more primitive a defense mechanism, the less effective it works for a person over the long-term. However, more primitive defense mechanisms are usually very effective short-term, and hence are favored by many people and children especially (when such primitive defense mechanisms are first learned). Adults who don’t learn better ways of coping with stress or traumatic events in their lives will often resort to such primitive defense mechanisms as well. Most defense mechanisms are fairly unconscious – that means most of us don’t realize we’re using them in the moment. Some types of psychotherapy can help a person become aware of what defense mechanisms they are using, how effective they are, and how to use less primitive and more effective mechanisms in the future.
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