Ramon Pacheco Lecturer in the Department of European and International Studies

Ramon pacheco lecturer in the department of european

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(Ramon Pacheco, Lecturer in the Department of European and International Studies at King's College London, Associate of the Lau China Institute. His peer reviewed publications have appeared in International Relations of the Asia Pacific* Asia Europe Journal* Journal of European Integration and East Asia, .“The EU, the US and China _ Towards a New International Order?,” pg google books//um-ef)Hence, despite the reluctance of Chinese and American leaders to explicitly refer to the G2, the S&ED is one of the ways in which it has been institutionalized. The mere existence of the S&BD is so significant that this mechanism has moved relations between the two most powerful great powers away from the Cold War model of superpower relations, based on political and diplomatic enmity and proxy wars. Thanks to the S&ED, Washington and Beijing can openly discuss issues that could otherwise derail their relationship were they not to be tackled bilaterally. Moreover, even though theS&ED does not create binding agreements, it does produce statements and memorandums of understanding that can be used by either party to hold the other one accountable.Peer pressure, especially in a bilateral setting, can be as - or even more - effective than binding agreements lacking penalties to warrant against failure to comply. Thanksto the S&ED, Chinese and American officials now have an institution helpful to build mutual trust.
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Plan = MultilatAnd, the plan spurs multilateral action – don’t need to wait Dizikies ‘9(Peter, “Why Progress On Climate Change Hinges On Our Relationship With Just One Nation: China,” pg online @ //um-ef)Climate change knows no geopolitical boundaries. Increasingly, neither does science. So it might seem that a multilateral approach, one that capitalizes on the increasingly international structure of science, would be the best way to combat the problem. After all, as more researchers from more countries tackle global warming, the greater our chances of developing much-needed technological breakthroughs. Yet the best route to those innovations may not be globe-wide research and development. It may well be preferable to concentrate such efforts in two countries: the United States and China. Indeed, as President Barack Obama reaches his 100th day in office, a vocal group of scientists and policymakers are calling for an unprecedented bilateral clean-energy initiative between the countries. “We cannot solve the climate change problem without direct engagement between the United States and China,” saysJoanna Lewis, a professor of science, technology, and international affairs at Georgetown University. Lewis also served as the research director for a report on the subject released in February by the Asia Society and the Pew Center for Climate Change, which argues that “the world will take a giant step forward in combating climate change” if the US and China can agree
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