Rough winds suggests instability the eye of heaven

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winds” suggests instability. “The eye of heaven” refers to the sun. “His gold complexion dimmed” means that the sun is hidden behind a cloud, leading to darkness. While the sun is bright, eventually it must go down. Nighttime approaches and the beauty of the day ends. This
beauty is finite. The first and second quatrains paint a picture of a flawed love; like the weather, this love has limits. It is subject to the laws of time and the general rules of nature. But this sonnet places Shakespeare’s lover and the longevity of their love above the norm previously set forth. “More lovely and more temperate” illustrates that the receiver of this poem does not have the flaws of summer; she is not limited by time or law; she is pure. “All too short a date” refers to the undeniable fact that eventually the summer must fade into autumn, but must love? The seventh and eight lines remind that beauty dims over time due to nature and chance constantly changing our identity.But the final six lines of this sonnet explain that this particular love will defy time; the object of Shakespeare’s affections is so pure, that time cannot corrupt her beauty. But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. This affirms that the receiver of this poem, unlike the summer, “shall not fade”. Her purest aspects will be eternalized in poetry. Although death may claim her body, it cannot claim the memories she left behind. By writing about this woman, Shakespeare ensures that while she may fade away, she will not be forgotten. She transcends her physical beauty to become something spiritual, and therefore eternal. This elegant sonnet rings with undeniable truth. Love is more than words of passion; it inspires. “So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see” this love will live on in Shakespeare’s lines.

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