RB Soul 1720 jazz musicians who are interested in fusion want to use pop music

Rb soul 1720 jazz musicians who are interested in

This preview shows page 12 - 17 out of 38 pages.

R&B, Soul 17:20 jazz musicians who are interested in fusion want to use pop music for their own jazz  ends where does pop go? mainstream pop of 1950s = singers displace big bands: Patti Page, Tony Bennett, Perry Como, Nat “King” Cole golden age of pop song LPs for adults, televisions Frank Sinatra 1940s: “The Voice” with Tommy Dorsey ballad crooner – uses microphone, not that powerful of a voice 1950s: jet-set hipster, film star “Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams: “Too Marvelous for Words” – from TV show; he (vocals) is focus of attention, big band  underneath him Jazz and TV/film jazz = “beatnik” culture unwashed bongo players Maynard G. Krebs (Dobie Gillis) – 1961 soundtracks: crime, drugs, violence, urban decay Peter Gunn theme, Henry Mancini
Image of page 12
R&B, Soul 17:20 Sweet Smell of Success (1957) race music becomes known as  “rhythm and blues”  (Billboard, 1949) new black audience, urban, affluent “jump music” Nat “King” Cole Trio Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five  – pop group directed at modern black audiences,  but also aware of white audience and the fact that popularity spills over Louis Jordan blues “shuffle”  beat (kinda like boogie-woogie) Southern black humor “Caldonia” – movie short (kind of like a music video) Rhythm and Blues dance music new urbane stules of blackness “Good Rockin’ Tonight” (1948) rhythm and blues becomes… rock ‘n’ roll
Image of page 13
R&B, Soul 17:20 Elvis Presley  – “Good Rockin’ Tonight” (1954) Ray Charles , piano (1950s) soul – brings in gospel tradition, which had been set apart from pop gospel into pop new forms of “blackness” “I Got a Woman” (1954) – gospel-y beat Soul Jazz keeping up with black pop strong backbeat simple harmonies ethnic titles (“Dis Here, Doodlin’) hit singles that will appeal to black community hard bop bands – hit singles, and then into jazz tunes bebop solo over that tune “The Preacher” Horace Silver known as  “funky” = smell  – term tuned around into meaning a down to earth groove,  new dance groove less walking bass    syncopated bass line Cannonball Adderley , alto sax Miles Davis Sextet
Image of page 14
R&B, Soul 17:20 Cannonball Adderley Quintet – hardbop band with distinct soul front “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy” – connect with audience and groove pretends to be a preacher “live” recording – “faked” for album gospel introduction Joe Zawinul , composer, pianist from Vienna playing an electric piano Hammond B-3 Organ from black church in 1955 wanted it to sound good, yet be portable organ trios: organ + guitar + drums organ plays bass line – pedals soulful groove – local black nightclubs (1950s, 60s) “The Incredible” Jimmy Smith torrents of notes – keyboard + drawbars + (timbre)  pedals (bass) ethnic themes: The Sermon, House Party, Back at the Chicken Shack
Image of page 15
Latin Jazz 17:20 cubop  (Cuban musicians mixed with bebop) – Dizzy Gillespie and his own band in  1940s “Manteca” Chano Pozo: Cuban drummer opening: rhythmic layers, static chord progression bridge: composed by Gillespie, complex chromatic harmonies from Afro-Cuban to big-band bebop solo: “Big Nick” Nicholas salsa new dance music, 1950s-60s intense polyrhythm timbales, congas “Cachao Descagra Cubana” 1957 “Watermelon Man” cross over from soul jazz   radio friendly salsa
Image of page 16
Image of page 17

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 38 pages?

  • Spring '12
  • ScottDeVeaux
  • The Land, Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock, Avant­garde Jazz

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture