The method of navigation must prevent children from accessing the features of

The method of navigation must prevent children from

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• The method of navigation must prevent children from accessing the features of the operating system. • The method of navigation must prevent children from stopping its execution. • High-Resolution graphics. • Drag-and-drop functionality, so that screen elements can easily be manipulated to accomplish tasks. • Highly interactive operation, with fast response time and immediate feedback to users. • Support for streaming media, with fast response time. • Support for children with special needs, such as low vision or hearing disabilities. • Online help in a format that is comfortable for children and easy for them to use. In addition, the grant requires us to give periodic reports to the donor about the frequency with which each exploration activity is used.
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Exam Name: Analyzing Requirements and Defining Microsoft .Net Solution Architectures Exam Type: Microsoft Exam Code: 70-300 Section Name: Case Studies + Practice Questions Section No: A, B Case Studies: 16 Total Questions: 251 Page 97 of 182 Questions & Answers Question: 1. Which solution concept should you recommend for the Baldwin Museum of Science? A. Console application B. Thick client application C. N-tier application D. Web application Answer: C Explanation: Our design involves front-end kiosk (running on Internet Explorer with kiosk mode on), middle tier consisting of an ASP.Net website, and a backend reporting Database. Our solution does not envision a standalone kiosk. Note: For standalone kiosks, a thick client application is suggested: Graphic s. If an application makes heavy use of highly dynamic graphics, such as computer- aided design (CAD) or video applications, then you need to use a rich client. Highly interactive applications are those that present a dynamic user interface that changes frequently based on user input (for example, a word processor, a game, or a CAD application), allows drag-and-drop operations, performs immediate inter-control validations, and so on. We specifically need drag and drop operations. Network bandwidth. A thin-client application generally uses much more network bandwidth than a locally hosted rich client. This is especially true if the interface uses Web server controls because many mouse clicks result in a round trip to the Web server. This is also true for Terminal Services clients and remote desktop connections because, in the case of remote clients, user interface rendering and responses need to travel across the network. Therefore, if network bandwidth is an issue, a rich client is the preferred choice. Here bandwidth is an issue. • . CPU-intensive operations. If users need to perform operations that require a lot of CPU- intensive work (for example, CAD and graphics applications), these operations should occur on the end-user’s computer; otherwise the operations could quickly overload the server. CPU- intensive applications are best suited to a rich-client environment.
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