To get into the net stance Place your racket foot forward non racket foot at

To get into the net stance place your racket foot

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To get into the net stance, Place your racket foot forward; non-racket foot at the back. Place your racket in front of your body, slightly above waist height. Raise your non-racket arm for body balance. Place your body weight slightly forward and get ready to pounce forward.
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Badminton Footwork Badminton footwork basically encompasses two main things: 1.Where you position yourself on the court 2.How you position your feet The three main benefits of mastering proper footwork are as follows: 3.allows you to conserve strength by reducing unnecessary steps 4.provides sufficient reaction time for the next oncoming shot 5.increase your speed
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Here are three points to follow to improve your badminton footwork. 1. Position on the court - always return to base A common mistake committed by new players is to stay rooted at the same position where they hit the last shot. What they should do is to return to base position immediately after every shot. The base position will vary for a badminton singles and doubles game. The base is usually the centre of the area which a player is covering. This position is most ideal as it allows the player to get to where the shuttle lands with the least amount of footsteps. By doing so, you will have sufficient time to react to the next oncoming shuttle.
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2. Maintain stable posture and balance Badminton is a fast moving game that requires lightning fast reaction. As such, you may often find yourselves in situations where you need to stretch your legs and arms (forward or backwards) far and wide, to reach the shuttle. Such quick and big movements will affect your balance and delay your recovery to base. In order to maintain a stable posture and balance, place more of your body weight on your stronger leg and make it your anchoring foot to the ground. Keep the other foot nimble so that you can stretch and reach the shuttle wherever it goes. By doing so, you will find it easy to return to neutral position without losing your balance and expending too much energy.
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3 . Be light and nimble and learn how to jump Being light and nimble on your feet can make a surprisingly huge difference to your speed. By adding bounce to your footwork, you will be able to respond faster to an oncoming shuttle, particularly the high shots. On top of that, adding jumps to your footwork is important for players who want to take their skills to the next level. Jumps are especially useful if you are covering the back court and can be executed in any direction. The best way to perform a jump is to take off with either one or two feet and try to land on both to spread the impact to your knees. Jumps are especially useful for smashes as this will give you a good angle for attack. At the same time, jumps are also good for retrieving high shots. Not only will this save you the effort of retracting backwards to retrieve the shuttle, it will shorten your opponent’s recovery time with your faster than expected return shot.
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Badminton Rules
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Badminton Rules For Singles In a single rally, there will be two players, playing with each other on opposite sides of the court.
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