14 control the questioningdo not allow the reporter

This preview shows page 31 - 34 out of 52 pages.

14. Control the questioning—do not allow the reporter to deviate from the incident at hand 15. Be confident (the officer on the scene is the expert) 16. When in doubt, ask for press credentials—never assume someone else’s authority 17. Carry a pocket recorder and record the interview—this verifies the conversation and may prevent inappropriate questioning 18. Know referral names and numbers in the PIO Office and provide them to reporters 19. Take nothing for granted—there are no private or “out of view” moments at a scene 20. Record reporters’ names and organizations and report media interaction to the PIO 13 PIO’s should be engaged in every aspect of training on media relations and marketing. They should play a key role in developing the curriculum as well as selecting and preparing instructors. They should take the lead role in inviting reporters and other guests to participate in training programs. Training for Public Information Officers is essential. Regardless of background and experience, it is important for members of the PIO’s office, and anyone designated to serve as spokesperson, to be aware of trends, new dynamics in use of technology, and best practices. Training Topics that should be made available to PIOs 1. Community development 2. Community demographics 3. Developing the core message 4. Marketing—external and internal 5. Branding 6. Politics of media relations 7. Showcasing value and success 8. Teaching technique 9. Web management and Internet practices 25
Chapter 6: Use of Technology Chapter 6: Use of Technology Two generations of people rely on technology and social networking as primary means of communication. Use of technology to support a law enforcement agency’s outreach efforts is no longer an option, but a necessity. Technology is critical to communicating with major segments of the community. Technology applied well can advance crime prevention, crime resolution, and service to special populations. It can assist in relaying information about laws, policies, programs, and events. It can be used in a crisis to relay information to all or geographically-specific areas of the community. It can be used to teach, foster partnerships, and calm people’s fears. Internet and Use of Web Sites Law enforcement agencies nationwide have embraced the Internet. Most maintain web sites to provide information on organizational structure, services, and events. Some have sophisticated sites that provide real time crime data and opportunities for interaction with people in the community. Many link to other sites, including local and state government, federal agencies, and nonprofit organizations. Use of web sites has proven successful in urban, rural, large, and small law enforcement agencies. They are used extensively by campus and transit agencies. Some agencies spend considerable funds on web development and support, relying heavily on contractors. Others develop and manage sites completely in-house.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture