The ultimate result is higher prices and lower quality because machines work

The ultimate result is higher prices and lower

This preview shows page 96 - 97 out of 272 pages.

The ultimate result is higher prices and lower quality because machines work faster, more cheaply, and more precisely than do human beings. It has been noted that 75-90 per- cent of changes in productivity are achievable through changes in meth- ods, machines, and materials, leav- ing only 10-25 percent to changes in human work patterns.35 Human la- bor is very inefficient as compared to machines, and an economy that de- pends on human labor as its base will soon find itself falling behind other, more technologically inclined economies. Further, labor-intensive indus- tries can succeed only if they can com- pete with other labor-rich countries such as India, Taiwan, China, and- increasingly-African countries. To do this, they must pay competitively low wages, or, in other words, keep the workers' standard of living down to the level of that in the competing countries. That higher wages hurt exports is an important component in current efforts to achieve a protec- tionist foreign trade policy. The need for jobs will result in increasing threats to humanity—munitions plants stay in operation and guns proliferate. Macarov 96 – Professor emeritus at Hebrew University [David, founder of Israeli chapter of the World Future Society and of Society for the Reduction of Human Labor, March 1996, “The Employment of New Ends: Planning for Permanent Unemployment,” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, , accessed 6/28/17] AO [Premier] GLOBAL DANGER The need to provide jobs for every- one blunts distinctions between nec- essary and unnecessary work , and - more important- between socially desirable activities and those that are polluting , dangerous , and coun- terindicated . The most general ra- tionale for overlooking dangerous leaks, structural deficiencies, and ecologically damaging activities is to point out how many jobs will be lost if the enterprise is moved or closed. A trade-off is sought--explicitly or im- plicitly-between the amounts of physical damage being caused and the economic damage expected to en- sue from correction or elimination. Finally, there is the foreboding pos - sibility that the blind commitment to full employment will threaten the peace of the world . Munitions manu- facture, including planning, develop- ment, testing , production, distribu- tion, sales , and so forth, makes up a relatively large portion of many na- tions' economies . Many jobs are de- pendent, directly or indirectly, on the munitions industry, including the whole area of satellites and their ramifications. Reduction in arms manufacture is heavily influenced by the expected impact on the unem- ployment picture. When a manufacturing plant -in- cluding a munitions plant- is threat- ened with closure , the possibility of job loss plays a large part in the po- litical decision whether or not to keep the plant open . As two examples, President Bush was reported as op- posing higher-mileage cars, and thus less pollution, because they would have resulted in fewer jobs, and the Connecticut legislature
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