Ten injunctions written by wang kon list of policy

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12. Ten InjunctionsWritten by Wang KonList of policy recommendations for future rulers, proclamations of culture currents that defined Korea
mid-late 10thcenturyKorean peninsulaOfficials more loyal since before got positions through powerful family positions, made throne more powerful by reducing power of aristocrats, brought stability after instability of previous 2 kings14. Civil Service Examination (958)Instituted by King KwangjongMeans of recruiting officials instead of social status and/or family power958KoryoAllowed men (no women) of talent not in prestigious lineages to gain higher positions loyalty for the king, new support base15. King Injong (r.1122-1146)Monarch of KoryoConvinced by Buddhist monk Myoch’ong (who also encouraged Injong to declare himself emperor equal to Chinese emperor) to move capital due to geomantic relationshipto misfortunes of dynasty (like attacks from Jurchens)12thcenturyKoryoMoved capital to Pyongyang but Myoch’ong Rebellion occurred when he stopped plans for moving the capital due to capital elite fears of power shift-Strife between Kaesong-based Confucian, pro-Chinese aristocrats and P’yongyang-based “xenophobes” (think Korea should be more assertive, lost), declared own empire, tried to overthrow Koryo unsuccessfully16. Ch’oe House Rule (1196-1258)Began with Ch’oe Ch’ung-hon (general/military official)Created order after military coup of 1170 (military officials amongst themselves for power), feudalism (king more figurehead, real power among military)12th-13thcenturiesKoryoCreated order after chaos of coup, overturned traditional rule-controlled king, faced Peasant and Slave Rebellions (arose due to unequal promotions for peasants/slaves after coup) and Mongol Invasions17. Mongol Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)/Tribute DemandsFounder of Mongol empire Genghis Khan (ca. 1162-1227) and grandson Khubilai Khan (1215-1294)Mongols took over Koryo through invasions during Ch’oe House Rule13th-14thcenturiesKoryoMarriage ties between Mongol princes and Koryo princesses, significant contributions to
European and Asian cultures, advances in medicine, astronomy, science, engineering, promotion of trade, peace under Mongols (Koryo monarchy ch’ung/loyalty in reign title),very expensive tribute payments to Mongols-including money, eunuchs, slave girls, rise of powerful families18. Lady/Empress Ki (d. ca.1370)From Koryo, favored concubine of Yuan emperor, possibly sent with tribute paymentGave birth to crown prince/future Yuan monarch14thcentury

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