I have three options for doing this one is to just go

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I have three options for doing this; one is to just go ahead and restart now, which will go ahead and finalize the update process, right now force the process to run, or, I can wait for the scheduled timewhen the system will be automatically restarted. It's telling me it's going to do that at 3:30 amtomorrow, or I can manually schedule a restart time. Come down here and click on Advanced options. We can configure how updates are installed. Notice that this is pretty much the same as the screen we saw in Windows 8 in Control Panel. We can specify that updates are installed automatically. We can specify that we get updates for other Microsoft products when we update Windows, and
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there's a new option down here called Defer Upgrades. With Windows 10 operating system upgrades were automatically downloaded and installed with Windows Update. In fact, the one update that we need to restart the system for, right here, is an upgrade. This will upgrade the version number of Windows 10. This is a fairly major update. You can decide here whether you want to just go ahead and install those upgrades when they come, which is the default, or you can choose to defer them. We can also view our update history as we saw in Control Panel in Windows 8. We have the option to uninstall updates if we need to just like we did in Windows 8. We can come down here and choosehow our updates are delivered. This is one of the key things that has changed in Windows 10. This is kind of a cool thing, because with versions of Windows prior to Windows 10, by default, you could only get updates from one location that was from Microsoft. Now it was possible to set up an update server on your local network and configure your workstations to get your updates from the update server, which was a good option if you had a lot of workstations. Instead of having all of these workstations, in your organization, going out and downloading the very same files, redundantly from Microsoft, wasting Internet bandwidth, we instead would download those updates once to the update server and all the systems on your network would go and get the updates from that local server. With Windows 10, we're taking that concept and making it more of a peer to peer model instead of a client-server model. Essentially what we can do is get our updates from Microsoft directly, as per normal with Windows 7 and 8, but then we can also get updates from other workstations on our network that have already downloaded that same update. We can turn that functionality off or on right here. By default it's turned on. We can also specify what computers we want to get updates from via the peer to peer network. One option is just the computers on my local network, which is selected by default. That's a pretty good idea. If you're a little more trusting you can also get updates from computers on your local network as well as other computers out on the Internet. I really don't care for this option. I have no idea what I'd be getting from other computers out on the Internet so I leave this option selected right here.
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