Tion fathers were more likely to perceive the

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tion; fathers were more likely to perceive the Internet asa good resource compared to mothers. Despite the con-tinued presence of gender roles in child care, fathers areincreasingly involved in taking care of their children[51]. However, Swiss fathers are not entitled to a pater-nityleavebylaw,andmostcontinueorreturntofull-time work immediately after the birth of their child[52], which may, on average, restrict their personal con-tact to the childs health professionals. Fathers are rarelyaddressed as a target group in research on digital mediabehavior in relation to childrens health and develop-ment. The few studies that did focused mostly on socialnetworks like Facebook or forums [31]. A Swedish studyby Fletcher et al. [53] also concludes that the Internetseems to be a suitable medium to reach fathers and pro-viding them with useful information and support concer-ning their parental role. In fact, promotion of digitalmedia to improve health literacy may be especially suc-cessfulinfathers.Further,ourresultsindicatethatfamiliarization and previous digital experience in seekinghealth information is a main factor for appreciating theInternet as a good resource. The more frequent parentsused the Internet for themselves, the more they agree it tobe a good resource to improve their health knowledge.There are some study limitations that may affect thegeneralization of results. The data were self-reported, whichalways carries the risk of reporting bias, and social desirabi-lity may play a role. However, we see no reason why parentswould misreport on their use or competencies with respectto digital media. The study sample was drawn randomlyfrom birth registries, but self-selection into the study gene-rated an overrepresentation of highly educated parents.Three quarters of parents in our sample had a tertiary edu-cation, attained by slightly more than a third in the generalSwiss population, aged 2544, and only 3% had a compul-sory education, 9 years of schooling, as compared to 10% inthe general population [54]. Additionally, parents who werealready interested in the topic and have a preference ofusing digital media for childrens health may have partici-pated more readily.Age of mothers at first birth in our sample was slightlyhigher than the general population (34.6 vs. 30.8) [55],which corresponds to the higher education level of theparticipants. With respect to household income the sam-ple seems quite representative; the mean household in-come in the Canton of Zürich was 8677 CHF and themedian category in our sample was between 6000 CHFand 9000 CHF [56]. The study was performed in theSwiss-German part of the country. Although compari-sons with international studies yield similar conclusions,we cannot rule out that digital health seeking behaviormight be different in other regions of Switzerland or inparentsofdifferentculturalbackground.Itisnote-worthy, that even though the study was in German, thuspotentially excluding parents less fluent in the language,

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