This event marked a point of no return for the Shahs government any chance of

This event marked a point of no return for the shahs

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This event marked a point of no return for the Shah’s government; any chance of compromise between the Shah’s government and protestors in favor of the revolution ended following Black Friday. These two events, and the revolution’s propaganda relating to each, facilitated the
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8 downfall of the Shah’s government in January 1979 and allowed for the implementation of an Islamic theocracy that survives to this day. In the aftermath of the Islamic Revolution, Ayatollah Khomeini’s visions of hegemony over this new theocracy began to come into fruition. Within the Islamic government system, a majority of the power falls into the duality of the president and the supreme leader. The president, responsible for the day-to-day running of the country, and the supreme leader, in control of foreign and domestic policy and the armed forces, work in tandem to run Iran (Buchta). Even so, in the early days of the theocracy, Khomeini shifted much of this power towards himself as the supreme leader. Focused on suppressing women’s rights and exiling moderate Islamists from positions of power, Khomeini attempted to create a patriarchal power structure based in radical Islamism (Tasar, “Iran: Lecture 4”). In regards to women’s rights, Khomeini began a movement requiring the wearing of the hijab, or traditional Muslim veil. Also, an Islamic penal code was drafted that stated women needed to ask permission from their husband in order to complete a divorce decree and that “the value of a woman’s life was half that of a man’s” (Ebadi and Moaveni 51). For example, if a car were to strike and kill both a man and a woman, the monetary compensation to the woman’s family would only be required to be half of the man’s compensation (Ebadi and Moaveni 51). In regards to positions of power, those who did not feel as strongly about the movement as Khomeini or those who opposed new Islamic laws were swiftly exiled from the new power structure. Those exiled from power even included Ayatollahs that spoke out against Khomeini’s hunger for power and his over-radicalization of Islam. While religion remains entwined with government and the memories of the revolution are still alive and well for radicals in modern times, Iran is becoming a country of reformers. For
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example, country leaders use Twitter to circulate news updates, public building projects have modernized the city of Tehran, and virtual private networks that allow citizens to connect to banned internet websites are a popular commodity for farmers and urbanites alike (“The revolution is over”). Also, the Iranian government has recently begun to allow women to attend major sporting events. Since 1979, women have been banned from attending male sporting matches, which included the Iranian men’s football national team games (Loveluck). This announcement, going against a ruling by Islamic clerics made in the reform period following the revolution, highlights Iran’s movement away from policies put in place during this time period.
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  • Fall '12
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