OR Bilateral Subcapsular Orchidectomy This is an operation where the

Or bilateral subcapsular orchidectomy this is an

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OR Bilateral Subcapsular Orchidectomy: This is an operation where the functioning part of the testicles is removed. This is normally done by taking out the centre of the testicles, leaving the testicles themselves behind but reduced in size. Sometimes, instead of this operation the testicles are removed completely. Your surgeon will discuss the surgical options with you. These operations are usually straightforward but there will be some pain or discomfort in the scrotum afterwards. There may also be some swelling and bruising in the scrotum that takes a couple of weeks to subside, and as with any surgical operation an infection can occur in the wound. Celecoxib Page 1 Version 2 (June 2005)
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STAMPEDE The celecoxib tablets are taken twice a day and will continue for a maximum of 1 year. They will only be stopped if your cancer shows signs of not responding to the treatment or if you and your doctor decide this is best. Unwanted effects may include stomach discomfort, indigestion, abdominal pain and flatulence, fluid retention, difficulty sleeping, sinusitis or a sore throat, a rash and a small increased risk of a cardiovascular event (see below). Recently, information from three long-term studies of celecoxib has become available. In the first study, which was aimed at preventing rather than treating cancer, a small increased risk of heart attacks, strokes, and/or deaths resulting from heart or blood vessel disease was reported among people taking celecoxib. Approximately 1 in 100 patients in this study on placebo treatment had one of these serious events. In contrast, between 2 and 3 in 100 patients taking celecoxib (between 400 and 800 mg daily) had one of these serious events. Another clinical cancer prevention study found no increased risks in patients taking celecoxib 400 mg daily. The third study, an Alzheimer's disease prevention study, did not find increased risks with celecoxib.
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