For the stomatal density experiment one person looked and counted in the

For the stomatal density experiment one person looked

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controlled were the cool air, hot air, and humidity factors. For the stomatal density experiment, one person looked and counted in the microscope so as to reduce inter-researcher bias and the nail polish impression was always from the middle section of each leaf. The four species of plants that the leaves that were used were taken from were, Bambusa vulgaris, Rhus intergrifolia, Gingko biloba, and a Polypod sp. For the leaf venation experiment, we used the leaves of Platanus racemosa and Phillyrea angustifolia and one person drew the image from viewing the leaves so as to be as accurate as possible (Figure 1). Results The average rate of transpiration for cool wind was 16.1634934942 µL / minute, for humidity 5.54176944 µL / minute, and for hot wind 8.31265416 µL / minute (Figure 2). The cold wind saw a 94.44% increase in average transpiration rate from the control while the humidity saw a -33.33% decrease in average transpiration rate from the control. The hot wind saw no change in average transpiration rate from the control. Stomatal density count was recorded for three different sections of the leaf impression on both the abaxial and adaxial sides and the average stomatal density was highest in the abaxial and adaxial sides of the Gingko biloba and lowest in the adaxial and abaxial sides of the Polypod sp. (Figure 3). The average stomatal size was
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highest in the abaxial side of the Bambusa vulgaris and lowest in the adaxial side of the Polypod sp. (Figure 3). For leaf venation, there was a larger vein length per area for the smaller leaves rather than the larger leaves (Figure 4). Discussion As expected, there was the highest average rate of transpiration when the factor of cool wind was controlled and there was a 94.44% increase in transpiration rate as opposed to no change with the hot wind and a 33.33% decrease in transpiration rate with the humidity factor. These results are in line with previous research that transpiration is closely linked with temperature and wind speeds (Gates, 1968). The difference in the temperature of the wind and the presence of wind
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  • Fall '09
  • SACK
  • leaf venation, stomatal density, transpiration rate

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