12 compare the developments in the political and

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12. Compare the developments in the political and social institutions of both eastern and western Europe.
Western Europe: Feudalism → Decentralized Allied with the Church → Pope has more power Eastern Europe: Centralized o Justinian Code → Unified law Emperor with absolute authority o Monopolized trade (Mediterranean) Constant conflict between emperor and pope o Excommunication of each other o Caesaropapism-Religious and political leader Social Western Europe: Stratified social structure o King - nobles - knights - serfs (each class dependent on others) o Code of chivalry Christianity only unifying factor in a decentralized place Patriarchal o women appreciated for beauty o Women given more power than before through the code of chivalry Self-sufficient o manors o trade developing slowly among serf class Eastern Europe: Religious wars w/ Islamic Empire o Islamic Empire constantly trying to invade - Byzantine slowly loses land o Ottomans eventually conquer Constantinople Patriarchal Trade important o Mediterranean trade o Silk Road in use o Constantinople is a center of trade 13. Compare Japanese and European Feudalism European and Japanese feudalism both used a lord and retainer system. In Japan, the lord was known as the shogun. The retainers were known as the samurai. Both had a code of conduct (chivalry, bushido). Everybody had a social role and there was security. Comparison of Feudalism in Europe and Japan Europe Japan
Nobility king, lord, lesser lord emperor, shogun, daimyo Warriors knights samurai Code of conduct chivalry bushido Evolution Both practices developed in response to the need for security and stability everyone had well-defined social roles helped preserve law and order 14. Compare European and sub-Saharan African contacts with the Islamic World Islamic Contacts in Sub Saharan Africa: Islam provided a political framework for trade and diplomacy over the eastern hemisphere from Africa to Southeast Asia; many diverse lands of varied culture thus became part of dar al Islam. Logical/natural for Muslim traders of North Africa to trade across Sahara with Sub Saharan West Arica. Established trading centers like Gao: copper, ironware, cotton textiles, salt, grain, carnelian beads traded. Koumbi-Saleh: capital and principal site of Ghana; many qadis and scholars lived there. Islam in West Africa: kings of Ghana converted: led to better relations with Muslim merchants; didn't impose Islam on their society though, and continued to observe traditional religious customs (magis, idols, etc). Mansa Musa: ruled during the high point of Mali Empire from 1312-1337. Made famous pilgrimage to Mecca: he took Islam more seriously and established religious schools and sent students to study there.

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