This new organization would firmly secure the

This preview shows 2 out of 3 pages.

this new organization would firmly secure the political sovereignty and territorial integrity of all nations, regardless of their size or military and economic power. e. Several of President Wilson’s Fourteen Points held out the prospect of self- determination (political independence) to oppressed minority groups living under the yoke of powerful, imperialist nations. For example, the thirteenth of President Wilson’s Fourteen Points promised the creation of an independent Polish state consisting of millions of Poles currently living under the coercive political rule of Germany and Austria-Hungary. Question 3 a. President Wilson signed into law the Espionage Act of 1917 and the Sedition Act of 1918, both of which represented a significant curtailment, if not an outright invalidation, of First Amendment protections of free speech and free press. These laws were used by the federal government to squelch and criminally punish dissent expressed by Socialists and labor leaders about U.S. government policy during World War I, and they reflected overheated fears about the political activities of German-Americans and anti-war Americans. The expansive use of these repressive laws to stifle and criminalize wartime political dissent was upheld by the Supreme Court in the case of Schneck v. United States (1919), which ruled that the government could nullify freedom of speech protections when such speech presented a “clear and present danger” to the security of the nation. b. Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) labor leader William D. (“Big Bill”) Haywood and ninety-nine labor associates and Socialist leader Eugene V. Debs were convicted and sentenced to prison under the provisions of the Espionage Act of 1917. Overall, the federal government undertook nineteen hundred criminal prosecutions, using the provisions of the Espionage Act of 1917 and the Sedition Act of 1918, to stem and punish the wartime political dissent of United States war policy expressed by pacifists, Socialists, radical labor leaders and organizers, and anti-war political activists. c. The wide wartime prosecution of Socialists, radical and antiwar labor leaders and organizers, and antiwar Americans of non-German descent demonstrates that the U.S. government punished political dissent and active opposition to World War I expressed by Americans of all ethnic and racial backgrounds. d. The United States government did not focus its criminal crackdown against wartime political dissent and antiwar activities emanating from the western states of the United States. While the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) maintained a heavy presence in the western region of the United States, many Socialists and antiwar activists prosecuted under the provisions of the Espionage Act of 1917 and the Sedition Act of 1918 lived in northern and Midwestern cities.
Image of page 2

Subscribe to view the full document.

Image of page 3
You've reached the end of this preview.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern