Madras Port Trust Narayana Iyer and Sir Francis After a year on Dewan Raos dole

Madras port trust narayana iyer and sir francis after

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Madras Port Trust, Narayana Iyer and Sir Francis: After a year on Dewan Rao’s dole, Ramanujan felt the need to secure a job. This time he had the backing of the Dewan as well as a letter of recommendation from E W Middleton, acting Principal and Professor of Mathematics at Presidency College, Madras. He applied for the post of a clerk at the Madras Port trust and in 1912 he finally secured employment. His immediate superior at the Port Trust was Mr. Narayana Iyer. At first an office manager and then chief accountant, Narayana Iyer, was the highest-ranking Indian at the Port Trust. He had been brought in to serve at the Port Trust by Sir Francis Spring, the head of the Port Trust. Narayana Iyer was also a mathematician and in fact served as a treasurer of the Indian Mathematics Society for several years. It was recognised by both Narayana Iyer and Sir Francis that they had a `diamond’ in the form of Ramanujan, even though the `diamond’ may have been unpolished. This was also a period when Ramanujan’s wife Janaki began living with him in Chennai. With encouragement from Narayana Iyer and Sir Francis, Ramanujan met several English men who he hoped would help him contact mathematicians in England. By then it had become fairly clear that the work that Ramanujan was doing was beyond the domain of the mathematicians in India. Among the English mathematicians that Ramanujan wrote to seeking mathematical advice were H F Baker and E W Hobson. Both were distinguished mathematicians and Fellows of the Royal Society, but both disappointed Ramanujan.
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On the 16 th of January 1913, Ramanujan set into motion events that changed his life forever. He wrote yet another letter. This was addressed to the Cambridge mathematician G H Hardy who was then thirty-five years of age and was already recognised as a mathematician to be reckoned with. G H Hardy (c. MFO) Letter from an Indian clerk to Hardy: `Dear Sir, I beg to introduce myself to you as a clerk in the …’ so began the letter that Ramanujan wrote to Hardy. The envelope that contained the letter was bulky. For along with the letter, were enclosed papers describing the various mathematical results that Ramanujan had discovered. The letter ended by asking Hardy for advice. Among the many results quoted in the letter that Hardy found rather strange was the claim of having found a function that nearly approximated the number of primes less than x . There were no proofs offered and to cap it all Ramanujan was claiming to have bettered the Prime Number Theorem (first conjectured by Legendre and then more precisely by Gauss). The Prime Number Theorem essentially tells one about the behaviour of the function, which for each x counts the number of primes less than or equal to x. The theorem had been proved independently by Hadamard and Poussin in 1896, nearly two decades earlier.
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