I could do it by myself when I was your age but now that Im approaching 75 its

I could do it by myself when i was your age but now

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After his look of surprised faded, he said “You’re exactly right! I could do it by myself when I was your age, but now that I’m approaching 75, it’s getting more and more difficult.” It was a short interaction and one that left us both with a smile on our face. 4
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RETHINKING RULES TO LIVE BY I can also identify other situations in which I have used the Silver Rule to guide my actions, most recently a broken bay window into my dining room caused by the errant throw of a baseball. Yes, this was the stereotypical “baseball through a window” scenario. I find a broken window to be quite frustrating, but I could see the petrified look on their faces when I brought the baseball out my front door. At this time, one could have escorted them to their parent’s house for punishment. Additionally, I quickly debated whether or not to have them pull weeds or other work around the yard to pay for the window. Ultimately, I remember being in a similar situation as a kid and know how I would not have wanted those “punishments” levied upon me. I made them a deal; in the future, play catch on the other side of the playground area and if any other kids are interested in joining in, include them in their game of catch. In exchange for these two guidelines, I would not escort them to their parents for punishment. All three of us seemed pleased with this outcome. The two boys seemed quite appreciative that I “did not unto them as I would not have wanted done to me”. There is no guarantee the two boys will include other neighborhood kids but that is not a factor used to determine use of the Silver Rule. As I take a brief inventory of the motivations that have driven many of the decisions I have made in my life, I am pleased to say that the Iron, Tin, or Nepotism Rules pale in comparison to the Gold and Silver Rules, though admittedly they still exist. Since the 1960’s, there has been an extraordinary value shift in American. Rather than reliance upon a religious or governmental authority to dictate moral behavior, Americans have increasingly based moral decisions on each unique set of circumstances (Johnson, 2001). Earlier in this course, I made the statement in a forum response that “Ethics are in the eye of the beholder,” and as this course nears completion, I am convinced of this truth. As humans, we will face a countless number of situations throughout our lives, each with its own set of decisions to be made. Each situation is 5
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RETHINKING RULES TO LIVE BY unique and as such, may require different approaches (moral rules) to arrive at the best possible outcome for all. There will be times when the Golden Rule provides the best possible outcome for all, such as helping a total stranger load sheets of drywall into the bed of their pickup. The most positive outcome in other situations may require the Silver Rule or Bronze. Carl Sagan (1993), discusses a new amalgam of metal to describe a rule with which I most closely identify, the Gold-plated Brazen Rule. As I indicated above, the Brazen/Bronze Rule appears to be a fair and just rule to follow. However, it fails to incorporate the concept of forgiveness into decision-
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  • Spring '16
  • BrendaHarper

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