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Psy 103-Psychodiagnosis

Dsm – i(100 disorders in 8 categories 1968 dsm –

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Unformatted text preview: DSM – I (100 disorders in 8 categories) 1968 DSM – II (100 disorders in 10 categories) ------------------------------------------ 1980 DSM – III (230 disorders in 19 categories) 1989 DSM – IIIR (Revised) (750 disorders in 40 categories) 1994 DSM – IV 2000 DSM-IV-TR (Text Revision / Update) 2013 DSM-V (see www.dsm5.org www.dsm5.org ) DSM-I and DSM-II Diagnosis DSM-I and DSM-II Diagnosis Consisted of brief paragraphs containing “horoscopic” descriptions of each disorder, e.g.: – 300.04 Depressive neurosis. This disorder is manifested by an excessive reaction to an internal conflict or to an identifiable event such as the loss of a love object or cherished possession. Deciding which disorder fit a particular patient was highly subjective and proved statistically unreliable. Features of DSM-III, IIIR, IV, IV-TR Features of DSM-III, IIIR, IV, IV-TR Phenotypic diagnosis – Based only on observable signs/symptoms – Abandoned intrapsychic conjectures and terms like “neurosis” and “reaction” “Chinese-menu” decision-tree approach – Inclusion criteria – Exclusion criteria Field-tested for reliability Multiaxial diagnosis DSM-IV-TR Phenotypic Diagnosis: DSM-IV-TR Phenotypic Diagnosis: e.g., e.g., Major Depression, Single Episode Major Depression, Single Episode Inclusion Criteria: A person must have experienced at least 5 of the 9 symptoms below for the same two weeks or more, for most of the time almost every day, and this is a change from his/her prior level of functioning. One of the symptoms must be either (a) depressed mood, or (b) loss of interest. – Depressed mood most of the day, nearly every day, indicated by subjective report (e.g., fells sad or empty), or observation made by others (e.g., appears tearful). For children and adolescents, may be irritable mood. – Significantly reduced level of interest or pleasure in all, or almost all activities most of the day, nearly every day. – A considerable loss or gain of weight (e.g., 5% or more change of weight in a month) when not dieting. This may also be an increase or decrease in appetite. For children, they may fail to gain an expected amount of weight. – Difficulty falling or staying asleep (insomnia), or sleeping more than usual (hypersomnia) nearly every day. – Psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day, observable by others, not merely due to subjective report. – Fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day. – Thoughts of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt ((which may be delusional) nearly every day (not merely self-reproach or guilt about being ill). every day (not merely self-reproach or guilt about being ill)....
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DSM – I(100 disorders in 8 categories 1968 DSM – II(100...

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