Simon Legree Toms ruthlessly evil master on the Louisiana plantation A vicious

Simon legree toms ruthlessly evil master on the

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Simon Legree - Tom’s ruthlessly evil master on the Louisiana plantation. A vicious, barbaric, and loathsome man, Legree fosters violence and hatred among his slaves. Read an in-depth analysis of Simon Legree . Cassy - Legree’s (slave) mistress and Eliza’s mother, Cassy proves a proud and intelligent woman and devises a clever way to escape Legree’s plantation. Emmeline - A young and beautiful slave girl whom Legree buys for himself, perhaps to replace Cassy as his mistress. She has been raised as a pious Christian. LOTM 1. There is reason in an Indian, though nature has made him with a red skin! . . . I am no scholar, and I care not who knows it; but judging from what I have seen, at deer chases and squirrel hunts, of the sparks below, I should think a rifle in the hands of their grandfathers was not so dangerous as a hickory bow and a good flint-head might be, if drawn with Indian judgment, and sent by an Indian eye. Hawkeye makes this pronouncement on Indians in Chapter III in response to Chingachgook’s proposal of racial equality. Hawkeye’s words typify the novel’s ambivalence about race. On the one hand, Hawkeye expresses surprise that Chingachgook can “reason,” having equated “red skin” with the absence of intelligence. Hawkeye’s insinuation is that Indians are inferior to whites. Yet, on the other hand, a different interpretation of these exact words could suggest that Hawkeye opposes racism. Hawkeye could mean he does not understand why most whites think Indians lack reason simply because their skin is not white. Hawkeye then praises in exaggerated fashion the fierceness of the Indian’s handmade weapons compared to the power of the white man’s rifle. While he expresses his amazement at the Indians’ prowess, his praise could be interpreted as condescending. After all, Hawkeye’s praise of the Indians includes a suggestion that Indians cannot operate rifles. Perhaps Hawkeye approves of the Indians’ skill with their quaint toys but operates on the assumption that the whites’ rifles are far superior if wielded by knowledgeable white men. Like the novel, Hawkeye expresses tolerance and racism simultaneously. 2. I am not a prejudiced man, nor one who vaunts himself on his natural privileges, though the worst enemy I have on earth, and he is an Iroquois, daren’t deny that I am genuine white. Hawkeye describes himself with these words in Chapter III when Chingachgook asks how white men like Hawkeye know about Indians. Though The Last of the Mohicans predates scientific knowledge about genetics, Hawkeye comes up with what sounds like a genetic description of the purity of his racial makeup. The adjective “genuine” suggests sexual purity, foreshadowing the
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novel’s later exploration of racial mixing and Hawkeye’s phobic response to the possibility of interracial marriage. Hawkeye holds mixed views on race, as these words show. Although he has strong friendships with many Indian men, here he demonstrates an energetic insistence on his own “genuine” whiteness. Although he asserts that he is not prejudiced, he shows his prejudice by implying he would injure any man who accused him of having mixed parentage.
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