COURSE INTRODUCTION WOH 1030 is designed to introduce students to Modern World

Course introduction woh 1030 is designed to introduce

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COURSE INTRODUCTIONWOH 1030 is designed to introduce students to Modern World History, from 1815 to the present. Building on developments from earlier Modern History, human interconnection and friction accelerated during this period. This period was marked by the two World Wars, the Cold War, and many other conflicts arising from competition for global resources. Rapid human population growth accelerated, accompanied by dramatic technological innovations and the subsequent impact on the global environment.
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2 During the term, we will discuss the major political, economic, technological, social, and environmental developments in the history of the Modern World to 1815, with special attention given to the growth of nationalism, internationalism, and transnational movements. COURSE READINGSThe following book is required for this course. It can be purchased in the campus bookstore or from a variety of online retailers—and you are not required to purchase this particular edition. Required:Sluga, Glenda. Internationalism in the Age of Nationalism. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013. The other required reading for this course will be posted online on the course website site. Additionally, you may purchase the following supplemental text for those who prefer a more traditional textbook: Supplemental:McKay, John P. et al. A History of World Societies, Volume C: From 1775 to Present. Bedford: St. Martin’s, 2008. (7th, 8th, or 9thedition) COURSE REQUIREMENTSCOURSE CANVASSITE: This course has a Canvas site at ().You must have a university email account to access the site. On this site, I will post your syllabus, course documents, reading assignments, and other information, as well as any announcements for the class (changes in test dates, sickness, etc.) I have assembled these materials to help you, so it is essential that you be able to access it.It is your responsibility to access this site before every class.READING ASSESSMENTS: The schedule of lectures and readings are broken down into seven units, each lasting two to three weeks. On the course website under “Modules” you will see folders for each unit. Inside those folders are pages for each day of class. I recommend that you visit each day’s page before class to complete the required reading listed for that day, along with the reading assigned from the Sluga text listed below under “Schedule of Topics.” DO NOTwait until the end of the unit to do all the assigned readings. On the daily pages, you will also find slides for the lectures, as well as recommended and optional readings. On the last day of Units 1-6 (no assessment will be given for Unit 7) you will take a reading assessment that contains questions that measure how well you understood the reading assignments and their relation to class lectures. Questions will be multiple-choice and short answer. Each assessment is worth 7% of your final grade.
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  • Spring '08
  • Carney

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