Djinguereber Mosque still stands today as testament to the glory of the Mali

Djinguereber mosque still stands today as testament

This preview shows page 7 - 9 out of 12 pages.

Djinguereber Mosque, still stands today as testament to the glory of the Mali Empire and the massive strides taken by Mansa Musa, as the university was constructed to house 25 thousand students, and had the largest library in Africa since the Library of Alexandria, with an estimated of a million manuscripts. The death of Musa is highly debated today as the dates of rulers to follow Musa recorded by the Islamic scholars placed his death in 1332, while other records state that Musa soon died after his return from Mecca in 1225. Accounts by the Arabian historian Ibn Khaldun, who was born in 1332 and died in 1406, state that Musa was still alive following the capture of the city of Tlemce that occurred in 1337. None the
Image of page 7
8 less it is clear to many that Mansa Musa was one of the greatest rulers the Mali Empire had from it’s founding to it’s eventual demise, and that through his vision the empire flourished and became I recognized power and central hub for many things ranging from trade to culture and education. He alone stands contrast to the point that Africa had no history prior to European interference as that even parts of Europe had come to know of his great wealth and started to trade with the empire. Economy The empire flourished because of its trade, more than of its conquest. The empire had three main gold mines, therefor were producing their own supply of gold and were not simply a depository. The empire also taxed all gold, copper and salt entering its borders. The empire would eventually come to produce almost half the world’s (Africa, Europe, Asia) gold. It is also suggested by Ibn Battuta that slave trade was a large part of the economy as in his travels he once traveled with six hundred slave women. To stem the inflation of gold the empire made a law that all gold entering the borders belonged to the Mansa and was to be handed to the imperial treasury upon entering the borders, in compensation the person would then be given gold dust worth the same amount as his original gold, and while gold dust was used all over the empire its worth was not the same in all provinces. Another large part of the Mali economy was salt, that was in equal value to gold in the North, and even more Expensive in the South, were is was less plentiful and used more often, such as in the southerner peoples diets. Naini itself was a major selling hub for salt, with merchants bringing camels carrying salt to the capital. This was a large part of the Taghazan economy where Ibn Battuta notated there were no more trees, only sand and salt mines. Building in the area were also constructed of salt, as it was easier to have enough to build with, in this specific area. Decline The decline of the Mali Empire began fifteenth century. Konkodougou Kamissa Keita came to rule in 1360 and was named Mansa Mari Djata Keita II. His was an oppressive ruler that nearly bankrupt the empire, spending money on lavish luxuries, although he kept good a good relationship with Morocco. The next Mansa, Musa Keita II, through his time as Mansa in effect lost the city of Gao, and the native
Image of page 8
Image of page 9

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 12 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture